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Abstract: FR-PO283

Development of Malignant Disease Associated with Glomerular Hyperfiltration in Asian Population

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Kim, Yaerim, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Paek, Jin hyuk, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Woo Yeong, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jin, Kyubok, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Seungyeup, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Hajeong, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Joo, Kwon Wook, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yon Su, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Dong Ki, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Renal hyperfiltration (RHF) is associated with all-cause mortality. Herein, we evaluated the association between RHF and the development of malignant diseases, which is the most common cause of mortality.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) database for a people who received nationwide health check-up in 2009. The population with age <18 years old, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60ml/min/m2, presence of history for malignant disease or renal disease was excluded. RHF was defined as eGFR ≥95 percentile with age- and sex-matching. The primary outcome was a risk for development of the malignant diseases. Site-specific malignant disease was categorized according to body systems and organs using ICD-10 diagnostic codes. We used Cox regression analysis to identify relative risk ratio with multiple adjustments using age, sex, body mass index, income, and smoking status.

Results

A total of 1,953,123 examiners were included in this study with 1,853,114 (94.9%) and 100,009 (5.1%) in RHF negative and positive group, respectively. Overall cancer risk was significantly higher in the RHF group (adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.07-1.16, p <0.0001). Type-specific cancer risk was increased in digestive, stomach, colorectal, liver, uterus and ovary, multiple myeloma, and leukemia in RHF group. In the subgroup analysis according to sex, risks of cancer in digestive, stomach, colorectal, liver, respiratory and lung were higher in male with RHF. On the contrary, digestive, stomach, uterus and ovary, multiple myeloma, and leukemia showed significantly increased risk for female with RHF. After adjusting the variables including age, sex, smoking, drinking, physical activity, economic status, BMI, systolic blood pressure, eGFR, history of hypertension and diabetes, RHF was significantly associated with the development of digestive (aHR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19, p<0.001), stomach (aHR 1.16, 95% CI 1.05-1.29, p=0.005) and colorectal cancer (aHR 1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.33, p=0.04).

Conclusion

The cancer risk in digestive organ was increased in an Asian population with RHF. Healthcare providers should consider the RHF could have a relationship with the development of malignant disease, especially in digestive organ.