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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO298

Correlation Between Blood Pressure and Development of CKD in 5.6 Million Korean Adults with Normal Renal Function

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Lee, Kyeong Pyo, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, Uijeongbu-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Young soo, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, Uijeongbu-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yoon, Sunae, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, Uijeongbu-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Young ok, The Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, Uijeongbu-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Although hypertension is well known for a major risk factor of renal progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), there are few studies on whether hypertension is also a risk factor of renal progression in the population with normal renal function. So we analyzed correlation between blood pressure (BP) control and development of CKD in Korean adults with normal renal function.

Methods

We utilized medical checkup database of the Korean National Health Service (NHIS). We enrolled 5,638,320 subjects including people who underwent medical checkups both in 2009 & 2015 in a row and excluding people whose estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) were already less than 60 ml/min/1.73m2 or whose urinalyses already showed proteinuria in 2009. New development of CKD was defined by the decline of eGFR to below 60 ml/min/1.73m2 in 2015. We compared age, sex, obesity, and various medical illnesses such as hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia between the CKD group (n=161,044) and the non-CKD group (n=5,477,276). We also stratified subgroups by initial systolic BP and diastolic BP by 10 mmHg, and investigated the risks of progression to CKD after adjusting these clinical factors.

Results

The CKD group showed higher incidence of old age, female, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, compared with the non-CKD group. Subjects whose SBP were more than 120 mmHg or whose DBP were more than 70 mmHg showed higher incidence of progression to CKD, compared with subjects whose SBP were less than 120 mmHg and whose DBP were less than 70 mmHg, respectively (odds ratio 1.037, 95% confidence interval 1.014~1.061 / OR 1.021, 95% CI 1.004~1.038).

Conclusion

We suggest strict BP control is helpful for preventing CKD in the population with normal renal function.