ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO205

Ultrafiltration Rate Correlates Better with Intradialytic Weight Change Indexed to Body Weight Than Absolute Weight Change

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Mejia, Christina Irene, Drexel University College of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Agarwal, Neil Kumar, Drexel University College of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Humaira, Sayeda, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Aggarwal, Sandeep, Drexel University College of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Ahmed, Ziauddin, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Intradialytic weight change (IDW change), ultrafiltration rate (UFR), and total ultrafiltration (UF) are used to quantify volume removal during hemodialysis (HD) treatments. These parameters are frequently used in clinical research to find associations between volume removal and outcomes like mortality and intradialytic complications. IDW change expressed as a proportion of body weight (indexed weight change) is rarely used both in the clinics and research. The objective of this study is to explore how indexed weight change correlates with the commonly used volume parameters during HD.

Methods

We reviewed records of 28 ESRD patients receiving HD in a single outpatient center in Philadelphia over a 2 month period. Treatments without UF were excluded from analysis. Correlations between absolute IDW change (pre minus post HD weight), achieved UFR (ml/kg/hour), and indexed weight change (IDW change divided by pre HD weight) were calculated using Pearson r. Range and mean of indexed weight change was also calculated and expressed as a percent of body weight lost (indexed weight change multiplied by 100).

Results

Individual intermittent HD treatments were analyzed (n=422). Absolute IDW change had a significant and strong correlation with achieved UFR (r=0.745, p<0.00001) and indexed weight change (r=0.824, p<0.00001). Interestingly, UFR correlated strongly and better with indexed weight change (r=0.963, p<0.00001) than with absolute IDW change. During treatments, patients lost an average of 2.13% ± 1.22% of their body weight with a range of 0.08 to 5.65%.

Conclusion

Our results show that UFR, absolute IDW change, and indexed weight change all correlate strongly. However, UFR correlates better with indexed weight change than absolute IDW change. Indexed weight change takes into account differences in body habitus of individual patients, and by transitivity, differences in their body surface area and total body water. Indexed weight change may be an important clinical parameter that could be used to guide UF prescriptions and more studies are needed to look into its association with hemodynamic changes during hemodialysis.