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Abstract: FR-PO510

Impact of Obesity in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Quero, Maria, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
  • Rama, Inés, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
  • Comas farnes, Jordi, Organització Catalana de Trasplantaments, Barcelona, Spain
  • Arcos, Emma, Organització Catalana de Trasplantaments, Barcelona, Spain
  • Hueso, Miguel, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
  • Sandoval, Diego, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
  • Montero, Nuria, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
  • Cruzado, Josep M., Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
Background

Some studies reveal that obesity is associated with a decrease in mortality in hemodialysis patients. However, few studies have addressed the association between BMI in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients.

Methods

We performed this longitudinal, retrospective study, to evaluate the impact of obesity in PD patients, using data from the Registry of Renal Patients of Catalonia from 2002 to 2015 (n = 1573).
Obesity was defined as BMI> 30; low weight: BMI <18.5; normal range: BMI 18.5-24.99; and pre-obesity: BMI 25-29.99. Variations in BMI were calculated during follow-up. The main variables evaluated were the technique and patient survival.

Results

Obesity was observed in 20% of patients starting PD. We did not find differences in sex or PD modality, being older the obesity group (65.9% are ≥55 years versus 59% non-obese p=0.003) and presenting more DM and cardiovascular disease (47.9% obese versus 25.1% non obese and 41.7% versus 31.5% respectively).
We did not observed differences in hemoglobin, albumin and KTV in obese patients. Concerning peritonitis rate we did not find any difference between groups, presenting more peritonitis patients on CAPD and ≥65 years (subhazard ratio (SHR) 1.75 (p= 0.000) and 1.56 (p=0.009)).
Related to technique survival, we found higher transfer to HD in obese group in the univariate analysis that was not confirmed in the multivariate analysis (SRH 1.12 (p=0.4)), and we did not found differences in mortality rate.
In relation to be transplanted, underweight group, olders and patients with cardiovascular disease or diabetic nephropathy presented less probability (SHR 0.65, 0.24. 0.5 and 0.54 p <0.05).
Obese patients did not present differences in survival with weight changes, but in non-obese patients, the gain of 7% of the basal weight during the first year supposed a protective factor of dying (HR 0.6 p=0.034).

Conclusion

We did not observe differences in PD adequacy parameters, technique and patient survival or probability of being transplant in obesity group. However, we found that obese patients presented more DM and cardiovascular diseases that are related to higher morbi-mortality in the multivariate analysis.