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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO1020

The Effect of Supplementation with Zinc Acetate Hydrate for Hypozincemia on Renal Anemia

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Sato, Eiichi, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo City, Chiba Prefecture, Japan
  • Degawa, Manaka, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo city, Chiba, Japan
  • Ono, Takao, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo city, Chiba, Japan
  • Lu, Hongmei, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo city, Chiba, Japan
  • Amaha, Mayuko, Toho University School of Medicine, Nakano-ku, ToKyo, Japan
  • Nomura, Mayumi, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo city, Chiba, Japan
  • Matsumura, Daisuke, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo city, Chiba, Japan
  • Nakamura, Tsukasa, Shinmatsudo Central General Hospital, Matsudo city, Chiba, Japan
  • Ono, Yuko, Dokkyo Medical University, Koshigaya Hospital, Koshigaya, Saitama prefecture, Japan
  • Ueda, Yoshihiko, Saitama Medical Center, Koshigaya, Japan
Background

Whether zinc supplementation with zinc acetate hydrate for hypozincemia improved renal anemia in hemodialysis patients was examined.

Methods

Study participants included 21 hemodialysis patients who presented with a serum zinc level of less than 60 mg/dL and who were administered zinc acetate hydrate at 50 mg (the dose was reduced to 25 mg, as appropriate) for 6 months. Patients having a hemorrhagic lesion, acute phase diseases (pneumonia or cardiac failure) or hematologic disease, and those whose treatment was switched from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis were excluded. The change in the erythropoietin resistance index (ERI) before and after the administration of zinc acetate hydrate, was examined; ERI was defined as the dose of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA; IU/week/body weight [kg]/hemoglobin content [g/dL]). The difference between the two groups was analyzed using a Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and a difference with p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results

The study patients consisted of 19 males and 2 females aged between 41 and 95 years (mean ± standard deviation [SD]; 67.1 ± 13.6). Changes in values of measured parameters, before and after the administration of zinc acetate hydrate, were as follows: blood hemoglobin content did not change significantly from 10.0 – 13.6 g/dL (11.5 ± 1.0 g/dL) to 10.2 – 12.4 g/dL (11.4 ± 0.7 g/dL); the serum zinc concentration significantly increased from 33 – 59 mg/dL (52.4 ± 7.6 mg/dL) to 57 – 124 mg/dL (84.1 ± 16.3 mg/dL; p < 0.01); the dose of ESA significantly decreased from 0 – 12,000 IU/week (5,630 ± 3,351 IU/week) to 0 – 9,000 IU/week (4,428 ± 2779; p = 0.04); and the ERI was significantly reduced from 0 – 18.2 (8.1 ± 5.1) to 0 –16.0 (6.3 ± 4.3; p = 0.04).

Conclusion

Zinc supplementation in patients with hypozincemia increased the serum zinc concentration and significantly reduced the ESA dose and ERI, suggesting that a correction of hypozincemia contributes to an improvement in patients’ renal anemia.