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Abstract: TH-PO265

Dialysis Recovery Time and Physical Activity Levels

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Randhawa, Lovepreet S., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Kotwani, Sonia, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Munugoti, Samhitha, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Dalezman, Solomon, Island Nephrology Services, Flushing, New York, United States
  • Nam, Kate, Albert Einstein Medical School, Scarsdale, New York, United States
  • Venkataraman, Sandheep, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Paredes, William, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Ohri, Nitin, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Abramowitz, Matthew K., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Elters, Antonio Carlos, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Ibarra, Jose Sebastian, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
Background

Longer post-dialysis recovery times are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Factors accounting for this finding have yet to be elucidated. We examined whether lower physical activity levels could be one explanation.

Methods

We conducted a prospective study of wrist-based accelerometry in a single dialysis unit. Fifty patients receiving thrice-weekly hemodialysis were enrolled and wore a commercial fitness tracker for 6 months which provided daily step count data. Average monthly post-dialysis recovery times were assessed by asking How long does it take you to recover from a dialysis session?” Mixed effects models adjusted for age, sex, race, BMI, diabetes status, and ultrafiltration volume, with random coefficients for follow-up time, were created to examine the association of recovery time with daily step counts.

Results

Only the 48 patients who had at least a month of step-count data available were included in the analysis. The cohort consisted of 51% women, 40% African-Americans and 47% were diabetic. Patients who reported recovery time of <15 minutes walked 5576(+/-427) steps per day in comparison to patients who reported recovery time of > 12 hours and walked 3260(+/- 573) steps. After adjustment, compared with patients in the <15 min recovery time group, those in the 15min-2 hr group took 271 fewer steps(95% CI ,-1038 to 496), 2-6 hours recovery took 1635 fewer steps(95% CI,-2456 to-812), 6-12 hours recovery time group took 2129 fewer steps(95% CI,-4417 to 170) and >12 hours recovery time took 2367 fewer steps( 95% CI, -3397 to -1336). In comparison, 10 years older age was associated with 1060 fewer steps per day (95% CI,-1350 to -770). Diabetes, gender, race and ultrafiltration amount were not associated with step counts.

Conclusion

Longer recovery time after dialysis is strongly associated with lower physical activity level. This is not explained by the amount of ultrafiltration. Studies should examine the effectiveness of increasing physical activity to improve outcomes in these patients.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support