ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO1194

Effects of Exercise Training on Psychosocial Health and Cognition in Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

Authors

  • Chan, Khin N., VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Rabkin, Ralph, VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Chen, Yu, VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Nagare, Atul Anandrao, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Niu, Tieming, VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Lit, Yiming, VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Kurella Tamura, Manjula, VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Myers, Jonathan N., VA Palo Alto Health Care System/Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
Background

The impact of exercise training on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and cognition in chronic kidney disease has not been fully explored. We aimed to determine the effects of 12-weeks of home-based exercise training on psychosocial health and cognition outcomes among elderly maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients.

Methods

Fifty-six patients (66± 7 years; exercise [Ex]: n=28, usual care [UC]: n=28) with end-stage renal disease on MHD (mean years of MHD: 4±4; mean Kt/V=2.1) were studied using the SF-36 v2, Kidney Disease and Quality of Life (KDQOL) and a battery of cognitive function tests as part of a randomized trial. Ex subjects underwent a home-based aerobic and resistance training program for 12 weeks. Eight components of the SF-36 v2 (bodily pain, general health, mental health, physical functioning, role physical, role emotional, social functioning, vitality), and 5 components of the KDQOL (burden of kidney disease, symptoms, effects, physical component score [PCS], and mental component score [MCS]) were assessed. Tests of cognitive function assessing general cognition, executive function, memory and verbal learning were obtained.

Results

Ex patients improved peak VO2 by 11% (p=0.01), while no differences were observed among UC. A 20-point increase in general health was observed among Ex (p=0.04), and trends were observed for increases in physical functioning and role emotional (p=0.08). No other HRQOL measures differed between EX and UC patients. KDQOL symptoms improved in Ex (p=0.05). PCS increased slightly from 38% ± 12 to 45% ± 10 (p=0.12) in EX. KDQOL measures were unchanged in UC. There were no significant changes in cognition within or between groups.

Conclusion


Home-based exercise training promotes health-related quality of life and some symptom metrics but did not affect cognition.

Funding

  • Veterans Affairs Support