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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0067

Analysis of AKI in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 102 AKI: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Li, Si, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Wang, Yichen, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Elavia, Nasha, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Milekic, Bojana, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Renal involvement is commonly seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The goal of our study is to analyze the impact and burden of acute kidney injury (AKI) on patients with SLE.

Methods

We analyzed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the years 2012 to 2014. We included patients aged 18 years or older with either a primary or secondary diagnosis of SLE. Descriptive analyses were performed with a focus on patient characteristics and comorbidities. We used weighted multivariable survey regression methods to assess outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA 16.0. We considered a P value of <0.05 as statistically significant.

Results

We identified a total of 101,615 hospitalizations with SLE, of which 9,475 (9.3%) had AKI. Patients with a diagnosis of AKI were younger (mean age 39.3 vs. 45.4), more likely to be male (16.5% vs. 8.9%), black (45.6% vs. 33.3%), discharged from a teaching institution (72.2% vs. 65.4%). Patients with AKI had a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease (53.2% vs. 10.1%), hypertension (74.5% vs. 47.5%). After adjustment with the patient and hospital level of confounder, the presence of AKI was independently associated with increased overall in-hospital mortality in patients with SLE (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 12.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.5- 22.4, p < 0.001). Length of stay (LOS) was 5.0 days longer (95% CI 4.5- 5.6, p < 0.001) in patients with AKI, and total hospital costs were $12485.6 more than in patients without AKI (95% CI 10656.1- 14315.2, p < 0.001).

Conclusion

Patients with AKI were more likely to die in the hospital, had a longer length of stay, higher inpatient care costs. Thus, the presence of AKI poses a significant burden on patients with SLE. Close monitoring and early treatment are warranted in this population.