ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0699

Markers of Inflammation and Risk for AKI and Need for Dialysis in Patients with COVID-19

Session Information

Category: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

  • 000 Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Authors

  • Torres Ortiz, Aldo E., Department of Nephrology, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Walker, Joseph B., Ochsner Clinical School, The University of Queensland, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Mohammed, Alaa E., Department of Research, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Mohamed, Muner, Department of Nephrology, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Lukitsch, Ivo, Department of Nephrology, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Velez, Juan Carlos Q., Department of Nephrology, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

Group or Team Name

  • Ochsner Nephrology
Background

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a reported manifestation of COVID-19 (CoV-AKI). Release of inflammatory cytokines has been recognized as a characteristic feature of COVID-19 and is linked to severity of illness. However, it has not been clearly determined if levels of serum markers of inflammation are associated with risk for development of AKI or its severity.

Methods

We conducted an observational study in patients hospitalized at Ochsner Medical Center over 1-month period with COVID-19 and diagnosis of AKI. We examined the relationship between the blood level of ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (proCal), D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the incidence of AKI, as well as AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (AKI-RRT), by assessing comparison of means and proportions and by logistic regression analysis.

Results

Among 644 patients with COVID-19, we compared 161 (26%) with AKI vs 414 (64%) without AKI. Median serum creatinine on admission was higher in the AKI group (1.8 vs 1.1 mg/dL, p<0.0001). Preexisting chronic kidney disease rates were comparable (35% vs 28%, for AKI and no AKI groups). The median value of inflammatory markers on admission were higher in the AKI group [ferritin 1016 (516-2534) vs 680 (315-1416) ng/mL, p<0.0001; CRP 163 (93-243) vs 93 (46-165) mg/L, p<0.0001; proCal 0.37 (0.2-1.6) vs 0.12 (0.06-0.32) ng/mL, p<0.0001; D-dimer 1.57 (0.96-5.14) vs 1.13 (0.68-2.57) mcg/mL, p=0.0004; and LDH 532 (365-804) vs 428 (309-548), p=0.0004]. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, CRP (p=0.003) and ferritin (p<0.035) were associated with greater risk for AKI. In addition, ferritin ≥ 1200 ng/mL and CRP ≥ 300 mg/L were independently associated with AKI [adjusted odds ratio: 2.3 (1.3-4), p=0.003, and 2.5 (1.0-6.3), p=0.05; respectively]. Furthermore, ferritin, CRP, proCal and LDH levels were significantly higher in those with AKI-RRT compared to those not requiring RRT (p=0.022 to p=0.009).

Conclusion

Higher level of inflammatory markers were associated with CoV-AKI, and levels were even higher for those with CoV-AKI-RRT. In patients with COVID-19, magnitude of ferritin and CRP on admission could be used for AKI risk stratification.