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Abstract: PO2044

Changes in the Gut Microbiota After a Controlled Feeding Study in Individuals with CKD and Healthy Controls

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Biruete, Annabel, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Wiese, Gretchen, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • Cross, Tzu-Wen L., Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • Thakkar, Riya, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • Lindemann, Stephen R., Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • Stremke, Elizabeth, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • Moorthi, Ranjani N., Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Swanson, Kelly, University of Illinois System, Urbana, Illinois, United States
  • Moe, Sharon M., Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Hill Gallant, Kathleen M., Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
Background

Diet has been shown to alter the gut microbiota composition and function. However, controlled diet studies assessing the gut microbiota in CKD patients are limited. We assessed the differences in the gut microbiota composition before and after a week of controlled meals in patients with moderate-to-advanced CKD and healthy adults.

Methods

In a secondary analysis, we studied patients with CKD (n=7, eGFR 29-55mL/min/1.73m2) vs. controls (n=7) matched for sex, age, and race. Participants ate a diet controlled for macronutrients (protein 0.8g/kg/d), fiber (25g/d), P (1500mg/d), Ca (1400mg/d), K (3500mg/d), and Na (2400mg/d) for 1 week. Fecal samples were obtained before and after the dietary intervention. Fecal DNA was extracted and used to amplify the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequencing was performed via Illumina MiSeq platform and analyzed using QIIME2 and LEfSe.

Results

Fecal microbial diversity did not differ between patients with CKD or matched controls and was not affected due to the dietary intervention. At baseline, control individuals had a higher relative abundance of Blautia and an unclassified genus within Coriobacteriaceae, while CKD patients had a higher relative abundance of Lachnobacterium. After receiving a week of controlled meals, CKD patients had a higher relative abundance of Anaerofustis and Clostridium, while controls had a higher relative abundance of Parabacteroides and Sutterella. Comparing data before and after dietary treatment within groups, CKD individuals had a lower relative abundance of Lachnobacterium and higher Bacteroides and Holdemania. Meanwhile, healthy controls had a lower relative abundance of unclassified Mogibacteriaceae, and a higher relative abundance of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, and Sutterella.

Conclusion

While there were no major changes in microbial diversity, healthy controls and CKD patients responded differently to a week of controlled meals.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support