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ASN Press Releases: 2015 Archives

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  • Screening Male Kidney Transplant Candidates For Prostate Cancer May Do More Harm Than Good
    Among male kidney transplant candidates, prostate cancer screening was not associated with improved patient survival after transplantation. Screening increased the time to listing and transplantation for candidates under 70 years old with elevated prostate specific antigen levels. Compared with candidates who were not screened, screened candidates had a reduced likelihood of receiving a transplant regardless of their screening results.
    Thursday, December 17, 2015
  • Chronic Kidney Disease Prevalence Varies Greatly Across Europe
    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease varies across European countries, ranging from 3% to 17%. Differences in rates of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity—which are risk factors for chronic kidney disease—do not account for this variation.
    Thursday, December 17, 2015
  • Dietary Cocoa Flavanols Improve Blood Vessel Function in Patients with Kidney Dysfunction
    Ingesting a drink rich in cocoa flavanols improved blood vessel function and reduced diastolic blood pressure in patients with kidney failure.
    Friday, December 11, 2015
  • Nutritional Vitamin D Supplements Do Not Help Treat Anemia In Dialysis Patients
    Vitamin D2 supplements taken for 6 months did not reduce dialysis patients’ need for anemia drugs that stimulate red blood cell production.
    Friday, December 11, 2015
  • Racial Disparities Exist In Access To Home Dialysis Among US Patients With Kidney Failure
    Among US patients initiating dialysis between 2007 and 2011, every racial/ethnic minority group was less likely to be treated with home dialysis compared with whites. Racial disparities also existed in patients’ risk of dying prematurely and their access to kidney transplantation.
    Friday, December 4, 2015
  • Native Americans Have Decreased Access To Kidney Transplants
    Native Americans have decreased access to kidney transplants and are more likely to die while waiting for a kidney than whites according to new research. Long-term survival outcomes in Native Americans who did receive a kidney transplant were worse than whites, according to a study presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 in San Diego, CA.
    Tuesday, November 24, 2015
  • Blood Phosphorus Levels Can Help Predict Kidney Failure Risk In African Americans
    An increase in serum phosphorus levels in African Americans with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with faster progression to kidney failure, known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study confirmed in African Americans what previous studies in Caucasians demonstrated, that an increase in the biomarker predicted ESRD risk. The research, from the Indiana University School of Medicine, was presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Thursday, November 19, 2015
  • Treatment For Sickle Cell Disease May Help Protect Patients’ Kidney Function
    After 6 months of treatment with hydroxyurea, sickle cell disease patients’ kidney function, as measured by the urinary albumin/creatine ratio, improved significantly.
    Friday, November 13, 2015
  • Stem Cell–Derived Kidneys Connect To Blood Vessels When Transplanted Into Mice
    After researchers transplanted kidney tissue generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells into a mouse kidney, the animal’s blood vessels readily connected to the human tissue.
    Friday, November 13, 2015
  • Nanotechnology Advances Could Pave Way For Implantable Artificial Kidney
    New advances in nanopore technology could lead to the development of a surgically implantable, artificial kidney. The research, a collaboration between UCSF and Vanderbilt University, was presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Tuesday, November 10, 2015
  • Kidney Failure And Its Treatment May Impact Cancer Risk
    Risk of kidney and thyroid cancers was especially high when kidney failure patients were on dialysis. Conversely, risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer, and certain skin cancers was highest following kidney transplantation, likely due to immunosuppressant medications.
    Monday, November 9, 2015
  • Dietary Potassium May Help Prevent Kidney And Heart Problems In Diabetics
    Higher levels of urinary potassium excretion, which closely correlate with intake amounts, were linked with a slower decline of kidney function and a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function.
    Monday, November 9, 2015
  • Investigational Treatment May Restore Kidney Function In Patients With Renovascular Disease
    A treatment consisting of vascular endothelial growth factor fused to a bioengineered carrier promotes the recovery of kidney function in pigs with a disease frequently observed in patients in which the kidneys’ arteries are blocked.
    Saturday, October 31, 2015
  • Innovations In Kidney Education Contest Winners Announced
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) announced the winners of the ASN Innovations in Kidney Education Contest, a competition to develop novel methods of teaching the kidney’s vital role in maintaining overall health. Winners will present their innovative tools during a plenary session at the society’s annual meeting, ASN Kidney Week 2015, the largest gathering of kidney disease specialists in the world.
    Friday, October 30, 2015
  • The American Society of Nephrology Honors Leaders in the Fight against Kidney Disease
    Five leaders in the kidney health community are being honored by the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), the world's largest organization of kidney disease specialists. The award winners will be honored at ASN Kidney Week, the world’s premier nephrology meeting. More than 13,000 kidney health professionals from around the world will gather in San Diego on November 3–8.
    Wednesday, October 28, 2015
  • Raymond C. Harris Elected President Of The American Society Of Nephrology
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN), the world’s largest organization of kidney health professionals, has elected Raymond C. Harris, MD, FASN, as the next ASN President. Dr. Harris’ election took place during the society’s annual meeting, ASN Kidney Week 2015, the largest gathering of kidney disease specialists in the world.
    Monday, October 26, 2015
  • Acid Reflux Medications May Increase Kidney Disease Risk
    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), a class of drugs used to treat acid reflux and other acid-related gastrointestinal conditions, may increase the risk for developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Two new studies that reached similar conclusions on the increased CKD risk associated with PPI use will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Monday, October 26, 2015
  • ASN Foundation for Kidney Research Announces Research Fellowship Program is Fully Endowed
    ASN Foundation for Kidney Research announced today that the Research Fellowship Program is fully endowed. The Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Foundation became 6th organization inducted into the ASN Foundation’s Founders Circle to fund groundbreaking, innovative kidney research.
    Monday, October 26, 2015
  • Rates Of Kidney Failure Due To Blood Cancer Are Declining
    The incidence of kidney failure from multiple myeloma decreased by about 20% from 2001–2002 to 2009–2010. Patients with multiple myeloma who develop kidney failure are living longer. Their likelihood of dying within 3 years after initiating dialysis declined by 28% from 2001–2002 to 2009–2010.
    Friday, October 23, 2015
  • New ASN-GWU Report Examines Key Challenges for Kidney Health Workforce
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN), the world's largest organization of kidney health professionals, released the latest in a series of key analyses of the US nephrology workforce authored by George Washington University Health Workforce Institute researchers. Nephrology is a specialty in transition, driven in part by changes in the health care delivery system. Geographic maldistribution of nephrologists and the “all-in” nephrology fellowship Match policy are among the issues that could influence the specialty’s future.
    Monday, October 19, 2015
  • New Medication Class May Safely And Effectively Treat Anemia
    Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (HIF-PHIs) create a low-oxygen state to stimulate the body to make more red blood cells. The drugs generated promising results in several phase 2 clinical trials in kidney disease patients with anemia.
    Friday, October 16, 2015
  • Certain Vulnerable Groups Are Less Likely To Use E-Health Resources
    Black race, lower neighborhood household income, older age, and Medicaid/Medicare insurance status were each linked with less use of an electronic health record portal by kidney disease patients.
    Friday, October 16, 2015
  • People With Sedentary Lifestyles Are At Increased Risk Of Developing Kidney Disease
    Each 80 minutes/day (assuming 16 awake hours/day) increase in sedentary duration was linked with a 20% increased likelihood of having chronic kidney disease in a recent study. Research that uncovered the association between sedentary behavior and kidney disease will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Wednesday, October 14, 2015
  • Statins Help Prevent Acute Kidney Injury Through Key Cellular Protein
    A protein called Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in blood vessel cells helps prevent acute kidney injury in mice. Treating mice with statins protects against acute kidney injury, and KLF4 is necessary for this protection.
    Friday, October 9, 2015
  • Award-Winning Actor And Comedian George Lopez Receiving ASN President’s Medal For Raising Awareness Of Kidney Disease
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) will bestow the President’s Medal to the award-winning actor and comedian George Lopez for his dedication to raising awareness of kidney health issues and his efforts to improve the lives of individuals with kidney disease through the George Lopez Foundation. Mr. Lopez will receive the society’s highest civilian honor at a ceremony at ASN Kidney Week 2015, on Thursday, November 5 in San Diego, CA. ASN represents nearly 16,000 kidney health professionals dedicated to leading the fight against kidney disease.
    Thursday, October 8, 2015
  • Calcium Supplements May Increase The Risk Of Kidney Stone Recurrence
    Diets rich in calcium decrease the risk of kidney stone recurrence, but calcium supplements may have the opposite effect. Research that investigated the effects of calcium supplements in kidney stone formers will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Tuesday, October 6, 2015
  • Racial Disparities Exist In End-Of-Life Care for Dialysis Patients
    African American, Native American, and Asian dialysis patients were 43% to 44% less likely than whites to use hospice before dying. Research that uncovered these disparities will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Telemedicine For Kidney Disease Appears To Be On Par With Conventional Care
    Among patients with chronic kidney disease enrolled in either a telenephrology clinic or a conventional nephrology clinic, compliance with telenephrology visits was shown to be equal to or better than conventional care. The study showed composite clinical outcomes (end stage renal disease, doubling of serum creatinine, and death) did not differ between the groups. This data will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Tenofovir Linked With Acute Kidney Injury in HIV-Infected Patients
    Acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) was prevalent among HIV-infected patients and demonstrated a high morbidity rate in a new center-based study. More than half of patients with TDF-associated AKI did not recover baseline kidney function during follow-up, and about one-third of the patients required dialysis, according to research that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Big Red Kidney Bus Gives Kidney Patients a Chance to Travel and Enjoy a Vacation
    Australian patients with kidney disease who require hemodialysis can travel and not miss their lifesaving dialysis treatments thanks to a new holiday dialysis program created in partnership by Kidney Health Australia and Monash Health. Results from a study of the Big Red Kidney Bus program will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • New Research Finds Prevalence Of Chronic Kidney Disease Has Stabilized In The U.S.
    New research indicates that the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the United States has stabilized overall. Analysis of the latest NHANES data is consistent with the recent plateau in the number of new patients with end-stage renal disease. The study indicates the need for continued efforts to protect Americans’ kidney health and will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • New Streamlined Protocol Reduces Acute Kidney Injury–Related Deaths
    A new streamlined electronic alert protocol that is linked to an intervention bundle has reduced mortality rates due to acute kidney injury (AKI) by 23% in a pilot study. A common condition in hospitals, AKI is fatal in 30% of cases. Results from the STOP-AKI protocol that could help reduce the worldwide burden of AKI will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Cadaveric Kidneys from Infants and Toddlers Benefit Adults In Need Of Transplants
    Adults with kidney failure benefit from cadaveric kidney transplants from infants and toddlers when adult organs are unavailable. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Efforts Are Needed To Improve the Diets of African Americans with Uncontrolled Hypertension
    The homes of urban African Americans with uncontrolled hypertension were often lacking either foods or needed appliances required for meals consistent with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. While African Americans with uncontrolled hypertension often had discussions with their physicians about diet, few discussions were related to the DASH diet. Research that uncovered these dietary concerns will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Studies Assess Racial Disparities Associated With Living Kidney Donation
    Increasing median income levels of transplant candidates’ zip codes were associated with higher rates of living donation, but African American candidates living in the wealthiest neighborhoods had only slightly higher rates than rates seen among the lowest median income areas for Caucasians. African American donors had higher rates of complications early after donation. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Equations Used To Place Patients on Transplant Waitlists May Create Disparities
    Three commonly used kidney function equations yielded discordant results for transplant waitlist qualification in a recent analysis. The findings, which point to the need for revised kidney transplant policies, will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy May Benefit the Kidneys
    The use of hormone replacement therapy may lead to better kidney function in postmenopausal women. Research that uncovered this link will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • New Studies Focus On Hypertension in Pregnant Women and Children
    Hypertension in overweight and obese adolescents remains under-diagnosed despite evidence supporting both as risk factors for heart disease. Lead exposure in pregnancy is linked with higher blood pressure later on in young children. In pregnant mice, microparticles released from cells can cause fetal death, preeclampsia, and embryonic growth restriction, along with inflammation and placental and kidney abnormalities. Studies that uncovered these findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Studies Address Long-Term Health of Living Kidney Donors
    New equations may help predict the lifetime risk of kidney failure in kidney donor candidates. Living kidney donors who develop diabetes or hypertension are at greater risk for experiencing reduced kidney function. The findings, which point to the need for revised kidney transplant policies, will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Advanced Kidney Disease May Increase the Likelihood of Falling Into Poverty
    Among patients with chronic kidney disease, more severe stages of disease were significant predictors of falling into poverty, as were black ethnicity, low educational attainment, single adult household, and low income. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Insufficient Sleep May Impact Kidney Health
    Shorter sleep duration was significantly linked with a more rapid decline in kidney function among participants in the Nurses’ Health Study. The findings, which point to the importance of sleep for maintaining kidney health, will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Transplant Tourism Increases Health-Related Risks For Organ Recipients
    Compared with recipients of living related kidney donor transplants, recipients who purchased organs internationally were more likely to develop hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and cytomegalovirus, and they were more likely to experience acute and recurrent rejections and surgical complications. Patient and organ survival rates were also lower in “commercial” recipients. Research that uncovered these risks associated with transplant tourism will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Donor Organs May Be Discarded Due To “Weekend Effect” At Hospitals
    Kidneys that would normally be made available for transplantation were less likely to be procured from donors over the weekend, and organs procured during the weekend were more likely to be discarded than kidneys procured on other days. The findings, which should influence future policy aimed at improving kidney transplantation rates, will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Gut Microbiota Changes In Diabetic Kidney Disease Contribute To Chronic Inflammation And Vascular Complications
    Among patients with type 2 diabetes and advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), a shift in gut microbiota diversity in combination with elevated plasma zonulin levels substantially impacts the degree of chronic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Zonulin could be a potential future target to control inflammatory immune responses, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Kidney Transplantation Prolongs Survival Compared With Home Hemodialysis
    Among kidney failure patients who were followed for 5 years, home hemodialysis patients were 4-times more likely to die than kidney transplant recipients. In elderly kidney failure patients, home hemodialysis patients had nearly a 5-times higher risk of dying during follow-up than kidney transplant patients. The studies’ findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Certain Blood Markers May Indicate Early Signs of Kidney Disease
    Six metabolites in the blood had strong correlations with kidney function. Two of the metabolites—pseudouridine and C-mannosyltryptophan—were equally good measures of kidney function while having some advantages over current measures of kidney function.
    Friday, October 2, 2015
  • Tallness Linked To Increased Risk Of Premature Death For Patients On Dialysis
    In contrast to studies in the general population, tallness was associated with higher premature mortality risk and shorter life spans in patients on dialysis. The association was observed in white, Asian, and American Indian/Alaskan native patients, but not in black patients. The overall paradoxical relationship between height and premature death was not explained by concurrent illness, socioeconomic status, or differences in care.
    Friday, September 25, 2015
  • New Treatment May Help Overcome Common Pregnancy-Related Complication
    In pregnant women with preeclampsia, a procedure used to remove a protein called sFlt-1 from the blood reduced the amount of protein excreted in the urine and stabilized blood pressure. Pregnancy continued an average of 8 days and 15 days in women treated once and multiple times, respectively, compared with 3 days in untreated women with preeclampsia.
    Friday, September 18, 2015
  • High Dietary Sodium And Potassium May Worsen Chronic Kidney Disease
    High urinary excretion levels of both sodium and potassium were linked with faster progression of chronic kidney disease. Patients with chronic kidney disease tend to consume sodium above the recommended daily limit.
    Friday, September 11, 2015
  • ASN Kidney Week 2015: Translating Kidney Research Advances to Improve Patient Care
    The world’s largest gathering of kidney health professionals—ASN Kidney Week 2015—will take place November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA. The annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), Kidney Week will showcase new scientific and clinical advances in kidney health from across the globe. More than 13,000 participants will share innovative approaches to improve the lives of the more than 20 million Americans and millions more worldwide burdened by kidney disease, the 9th leading cause of death in the United States.
    Friday, September 11, 2015
  • Kidney Community Unites to Urge Lawmakers to Advance and Protect Kidney Health
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) is one of 16 kidney health organizations participating in Kidney Community Advocacy Day 2015 in Washington, DC. More than 100 advocates will meet with Congressional offices to call for lawmakers’ support of increased research funding to accelerate development of new therapies for kidney diseases. Kidney health providers and patients will also urge passage of legislation that eliminates barriers to living donation and helps increase access to lifesaving transplants.
    Thursday, September 3, 2015
  • How Kidney Injury during Combat Affects The Long-Term Health Of Today’s Soldiers
    Among 51 military service members who experienced severe acute kidney injury during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, 88% of the injuries were due to blasts or projectiles. Twenty-two percent of the patients died within 60 days. Although still high, this mortality rate is significantly less than might be expected historically. The majority of survivors completely recovered their kidney function.
    Monday, August 31, 2015
  • Women with Hypertension in Pregnancy and Their Siblings Face Increased Risk of Heart Disease
    Compared with their sister(s) who had normal blood pressure during pregnancy, women who had hypertension in pregnancy were more likely to develop hypertension later in life. Brothers and sisters of women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy were at increased risk of developing high blood pressure later in life. Brothers, but not sisters, of women who had high blood pressure in pregnancy were also at increased risk of developing heart disease.
    Thursday, August 20, 2015
  • Antibodies in The Blood Provide Clues To Kidney Transplant Recipients Likelihood Of Rejection
    Among kidney transplant recipients, patients with mostly IgG3 donor-specific HLA antibodies had a higher likelihood of organ rejection soon after transplantation. If rejection occurred in those with mostly IgG4 antibodies, it was usually much later after transplantation.
    Friday, August 14, 2015
  • Living Donors and Recipients Want More Information about Each Other’s Health before Transplantation
    Most donors and recipients support swapping health information before kidney transplantation, but there was low interest in sharing social information. Both donors and recipients wanted the transplant team involved in information disclosure. Most donors and recipients did not think the recipient had a right to know why a donor was excluded from donating.
    Friday, August 7, 2015
  • Kidney Impairment Decreases Blood Flow to the Brain, Boosting Risk of Brain Disorders
    In a population-based study, poor kidney function was strongly related to decreased blood flow to the brain. Poor kidney function was linked to stroke and dementia most strongly in participants with decreased blood flow to the brain.
    Friday, July 31, 2015
  • Byproduct of Intestinal Bacteria May Jeopardize Heart Health in Patients with Kidney Disease
    Blood levels of TMAO, a byproduct generated from intestinal bacterial as they metabolize dietary nutrients, progressively increase with advancing severity of kidney disease. TMAO levels are dramatically reduced when kidney function is restored following kidney transplantation. High TMAO levels are linked with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and premature death in patients with chronic kidney disease.
    Wednesday, July 29, 2015
  • Many Dialysis Patients Are Unprepared For Natural Disasters
    Among patients scheduled to have dialysis during the landfall of Hurricane Sandy at clinics where electricity had been deprived, 26.3% missed dialysis sessions and 66.1% received dialysis at non-regular dialysis units. The percentage of patients who carried their insurance information and detailed medication lists with them were 75.9% and 44.3%, respectively.
    Tuesday, July 28, 2015
  • Tailored Mobile Health Technologies May Help Patients Take Their Medications Appropriately
    There was only a 5% error rate when patients with chronic kidney disease used mobile health technologies designed to help them use medications appropriately.
    Tuesday, July 28, 2015
  • Researchers Identify Potential New Targets for Treating Kidney Disease
    Proteins in the Wnt signaling pathway help drive kidney scarring that can lead to chronic kidney disease.
    Thursday, July 23, 2015
  • Electrocardiogram Screening May Help Predict Kidney Disease Patients’ Risk of Dying From Heart Disease
    Certain electrocardiogram measures helped investigators identify a subgroup of individuals with chronic kidney disease who had substantially elevated risks of dying from heart disease.
    Thursday, July 9, 2015
  • ASN Foundation for Kidney Research Announces 2015 Grant Recipients
    The ASN Foundation for Kidney Research announced the 2015 recipients of research grants to advance new understandings of—and treatments for—kidney diseases. Established in 2012 by the American Society of Nephrology, the ASN Foundation funds research that will help improve the health of the more than 20 million Americans burdened by kidney diseases, the 9th leading cause of death in the United States.
    Wednesday, July 1, 2015
  • Tapping into the Potential of Electronic Health Records to Improve Care for Patients with Chronic Conditions
    The National Kidney Disease Education Program’s Health Information Technology Working Group has identified strategies for using electronic health records to improve care for patients with chronic kidney disease, outlining specific design features and goals.
    Thursday, June 25, 2015
  • Kidney Health Initiative Seeking Patient, Family Input Into Development of New Therapies
    The Kidney Health Initiative (KHI) is hosting a new workshop on August 12 and 13 to gather input from patients with kidney disease and their family members on future treatment options. The KHI workshop—Understanding Patients’ Preferences: Stimulating Medical Device Development in Kidney Disease—will help inform development of therapeutics and devices for kidney disease, which affects more than 20 million Americans.
    Wednesday, June 24, 2015
  • Vitamin D Supplements May Benefit Children with Kidney Disease
    Among children with chronic kidney disease, those with lower vitamin D levels had higher levels of blood markers related to kidney dysfunction as well as greater kidney function loss over time. Five-year kidney survival was 75% in patients with vitamin D levels ≥50 nMol/L at the start of the study and 50% in those with lower levels.
    Thursday, June 11, 2015
  • Kidney Health Initiative Announces Inaugural Patient and Family Partnership Council
    The Kidney Health Initiative (KHI) has announced the creation and appointment of the inaugural Patient and Family Partnership Council (PFPC). The PFPC will provide patient and caregiver input into current and future KHI projects to promote and address kidney health issues.
    Tuesday, May 19, 2015
  • Study Characterizes the Incidence and Effects of Severe Kidney Injury during Pregnancy
    In Ontario, Canada, the incidence of acute kidney injury that requires dialysis is 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Otherwise healthy women who acquire a major pregnancy-related complication are at increased risk. In pregnancies affected by severe acute kidney injury, babies are at increased risk of having low birth weights or being born prematurely.
    Thursday, May 14, 2015
  • Dexamethasone May Help Prevent Severe Kidney Injury Following Heart Surgery
    Patients who received dexamethasone during heart surgery had about a 2.5-times lower risk of developing kidney failure requiring dialysis compared with those receiving a placebo. The greatest benefits of dexamethasone were seen in patients with pre-existing advanced chronic kidney disease.
    Thursday, May 7, 2015
  • Even Casual Walking For an Extra 2 Minutes Each Hour May Help Prolong Life
    In an observational study that followed participants for an average of just under 3 years, a “trade-off” of sedentary activity with low-intensity activity was not beneficial, but a trade-off of 2 minutes/hour of sedentary activity with an equal amount of light-intensity activity was associated with 33% lower risk of dying in the general population and a 41% lower risk of dying in the individuals with chronic kidney disease.
    Thursday, April 30, 2015
  • What Does The Public Think About Paying People To Donate Their Organs?
    Members of the public in Australia considered reimbursement and justifiable recompensation of costs related to organ donation to be legitimate ways of supporting living donors. Financial payment beyond reimbursement was regarded as morally reprehensible.
    Thursday, April 23, 2015
  • Family History Increases the Risk of Cardiac Arrest in Patients on Dialysis
    Among dialysis patients, genetically related family members have about a 70% increased risk of cardiac arrest compared with unrelated dialysis patients. Spouses on dialysis do not have an increased risk.
    Thursday, April 16, 2015
  • New High-Throughput Screening Method May Uncover Novel Treatments for Kidney Disease
    Researchers have developed a system that could be used to identify novel drug candidates that protect the function of the kidney cells that are damaged in patients with chronic kidney disease. One drug identified through the system effectively protected the kidney cells of rodents exposed to kidney damaging agents.
    Thursday, April 9, 2015
  • Kidney Health Initiative Seeking Patient Input Into New Therapies for Kidney Disease
    The Kidney Health Initiative (KHI) is seeking input from patients with kidney disease and their family members on future treatment options. The perspectives gathered in this new KHI project will help inform development of therapeutics and devices for kidney disease, which affects more than 20 million Americans
    Friday, April 3, 2015
  • Hormone and Bone Tests May Be Indicative of Dialysis Patients’ Heart Health
    High parathyroid hormone levels and subsequent bone loss are major risk factors for worsening of coronary artery calcification in patients on dialysis.
    Thursday, April 2, 2015
  • What To Do With Kidneys From Older Deceased Donors?
    For older patients in need of a kidney transplant, rapid transplantation from an older deceased donor is superior to delayed transplantation from a younger donor. Kidneys from older donors do not have sufficient longevity to provide younger patients with a lifetime of kidney function, but they do have sufficient longevity to provide older patients who have a shorter life expectancy with a lifetime of kidney function.
    Thursday, March 26, 2015
  • Study Reports Excellent Outcomes among HIV+ Kidney Transplant Recipients
    Compared with uninfected (HIV-/HCV-) kidney transplant recipients, mono-infected HIV+ (HIV+/HCV-) recipients had similar 5-year and 10-year kidney survival rates, while HIV+ recipients co-infected with HCV (HIV+/HCV+) had worse kidney survival rates. Patient survival among mono-infected HIV+ recipients was similar to uninfected recipients but was significantly lower for co-infected recipients.
    Thursday, March 19, 2015
  • Chronic Kidney Disease May Increase Certain Risks during Pregnancy
    Among pregnant women, the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes—such as preterm delivery or the need for neonatal intensive care—increased across stages of chronic kidney disease. The risks of intrauterine death or fetal malformations were not higher in women with chronic kidney disease.
    Thursday, March 12, 2015
  • Dialysis Patients May Have Faulty “Good” Cholesterol
    In kidney disease patients on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, enzyme activities involved in HDL metabolism and HDL maturation were significantly altered. The normal function of HDL was also compromised in patients on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.
    Thursday, March 5, 2015
  • Study Reveals How Dietary Phosphate Can Increase Heart Disease Risk
    High phosphate levels cause a stress signal inside the cells that line blood vessels, leading to the release of microparticles that promote the formation of blood clots.
    Thursday, March 5, 2015
  • Urine Test Predicts Heart Failure Patients’ Risk of Kidney Injury
    Urinary angiotensinogen levels at the time of hospital admission predicted acute decompensated heart failure patients’ risk of developing acute kidney injury with considerable accuracy. Patients’ urinary angiotensinogen level at the time of admission also helped clinicians predict patients’ risk of being rehospitalized or dying within one year.
    Thursday, February 26, 2015
  • Most Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease May Experience Long-Term Pain
    In a study of patients with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease, most patients reported chronic pain. More severe pain was linked with both proper and improper use of pain medications.
    Thursday, February 19, 2015
  • Why Are Kidney Patients Starting Dialysis Sooner?
    In VA medical centers, patients started dialysis progressively earlier in the course of their kidney disease in more recent years. There were no measurable differences in how sick patients were at the time of initiation or in the reasons for dialysis initiation to explain this trend.
    Thursday, February 19, 2015
  • Study Provides Insights on Enzyme That Helps Direct the Immune Response to Kidney Injury
    An enzyme called heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) affects immune cells as they travel through the body in response to kidney injury. In mice, the absence of HO-1 leads to poor recovery after acute kidney injury.
    Thursday, February 12, 2015
  • A High Acid Diet May Have Negative Effects on Kidney Health
    Among patients with chronic kidney disease, patients who consumed high acid diets were 3-times more likely to develop kidney failure than patients who consumed low acid diets. Low acid load diets are rich in fruits and vegetables, while high acid diets contain more meats.
    Thursday, February 12, 2015
  • ASN Partners With Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program to Create ASN-AMFDP Award
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) is partnering with the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP) of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to create the ASN-AMFDP Award and improve diversity in kidney health. The ASN-AMFDP Award will support the career development of a kidney research scholar and future health care leader from a historically disadvantaged background for 4 years.
    Monday, February 9, 2015
  • Signaling Pathway Helps Protect Healthy Tissue from Overly Active Immune Responses
    Researchers have shown that the messenger protein IL-6, which is rapidly produced at high levels during an acute inflammatory form of kidney disease, potently dampens activation of tissue-destructive immune cells called macrophages. The findings may have broad clinical implications because elevated IL-6 is observed in many different inflammatory diseases, and macrophages are often crucially involved in their pathogenesis.
    Thursday, February 5, 2015
  • Simple Test Detects Increased Risks in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury
    A simple test performed with the FDA-approved medication furosemide, along with a measurement of urine output, can predict which patients with acute kidney injury will later require dialysis. The test could help clinicians safeguard patients’ kidney health.
    Thursday, February 5, 2015
  • Kidney-Brain Connection May Help Drive Chronic Kidney Disease
    Salt intake accelerated kidney scarring in rats with chronic kidney disease by activating a brain-kidney connection called the renin-angiotensin axis that interlinks the damaged kidney and brain by afferent and efferent sympathetic nerves. Targeting these nerves reduced salt-induced kidney scarring.
    Thursday, January 29, 2015
  • Blood Vessel Calcification May Put Kidney Stone Formers at Increased Risk of Heart Disease
    People who develop recurrent kidney stones have more calcification in their arteries, which could explain their increased risk for heart disease. Kidney stone formers also have less dense bones, increasing their risk for osteoporosis.
    Thursday, January 29, 2015
  • High Blood Calcium Levels Linked With Increased Risk of Premature Death in Dialysis Patients
    Both low and high blood calcium levels, as well as high phosphorus levels, were linked with an increased risk of dying prematurely in dialysis patients, regardless of the type of dialysis. The findings address a pending Medicare quality measure related to dialysis patients’ blood calcium levels.
    Thursday, January 22, 2015
  • Tool Helps Measure Patients’ Readiness to Make Decisions about Starting Dialysis
    A new algorithm is a useful tool for measuring chronic kidney disease patients’ readiness for making decisions about initiating dialysis. Patients who have knowledge about their options and have fewer lifestyle barriers to home dialysis are more likely to be ready to make decisions. Doctors who explain all of the treatment options that are available can increase patients’ readiness for decision-making.
    Thursday, January 15, 2015
  • Study Provides Insights into the Role of Genetic Variants in Kidney Disease
    Among patients with a kidney disease called focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, those who had certain genetic variants tended to have more advanced disease when they were diagnosed. Patients with the variants responded to cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil immunosuppressant treatments just as well as other patients. Despite this response to treatment, patients with the variants tended to progress more rapidly to kidney failure than other patients.
    Thursday, January 8, 2015
  • ASN Releases GWU Report on Nephrology Fellows and Future Kidney Health Workforce
    The American Society of Nephrology (ASN), the world’s largest organization of kidney health professionals, has published a new report analyzing the results of the 2014 Nephrology Fellows Survey. Authored by leading health workforce researchers at George Washington University, the report provides key insights from future kidney health professionals. The report’s release follows the announced formation of the ASN Nephrology Match Task Force and the disappointing results of the 2015–2016 nephrology Match.
    Thursday, January 8, 2015