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Abstract: SA-PO019

Application of a Virtual Patient (VP) Program in a Medical School Nephrology Curriculum

Session Information

  • Educational Research
    November 09, 2019 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Walter E. Washington Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Educational Research

  • 800 Educational Research

Authors

  • Nakhoul, Georges, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Taliercio, Jonathan J., Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Louis, Shreya, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Wadhwa, Raoul, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Foshee, Cecile M., Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Bierer, S. beth, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Mehta, Neil, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Lioudis, Michael, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Nally, Joseph V., Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
Background

Immersive simulations have been shown to motivate students and promote learning in a fun and safe environment. Body Interact (BI) is among the most successful VP programs and has been used as a teaching adjunct by medical schools in the United States and Europe.

Methods

We identified 2 nephrology cases that would be appropriate for virtual simulation. We solicited the help of experts in order to build them in a VP platform. The VP cases were piloted then used during class in groups of 8 students accompanied by 1 teaching faculty. The VP allows direct interaction with the students including history gathering, physical examination, testing and live reaction to proposed treatments. At the end of each class, students were asked to fill a survey/feedback form that consisted of a 4-point Likert scale questionnaire rating student agreement [(SA) strongly agree, (A) agree, (D) Disagree and (SD) Strongly Disagree]. The questionnaire focused on 6 parameters: program interface, user engagement, perceived educational value, likability, need for improvement and interest in dissemination.

Results

All 32 CCLCM students used the VP platform for the 2 designed cases. The survey response rate was 73%. Ninety two percent of answers related to the program interface fell into positive categories (55% A and 37% SA), 90% of answers related to user engagement fell into positive categories (50% A and 40% SA), 85% of answers related to educational value fell into positive categories (55% A and 30% SA), 90% of answers related to the likability/need for improvement fell into positive categories (61% A and 29% SA) and 90% of answers related to the interest in dissemination fell into positive categories (60% A and 30% SA). Despite generally favorable feedback by the students, 68% thought that the program could be improved. Most of the desired improvements related to the speed of the program and to the presence of technical glitches on library computers.

Conclusion

We successfully incorporated a VP platform into the nephrology educational curriculum. The BI program was well received and was found to be a useful educational adjunct. Our experience taught us that the use of gaming engines may require considerable computer processing power and this will need to be taken into account in future virtual endeavors.