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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO436

High Serum Adiponectin Is Associated with Renal Outcome in CKD: Results from the KNOW-CKD Study

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2102 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Song, Su hyun, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Choi, Hong sang, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Chang Seong, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ma, Seong Kwon, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ahn, Curie, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Soo Wan, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Bae, Eun Hui, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Korea (the Republic of)

Group or Team Name

  • Chonnam National University Medical School
Background

Adiponectin, a peptide hormone secreted from adipocytes, exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-atherogenic properties. Paradoxically, serum adiponectin levels are increased in patients with end-stage renal disease, and those patients are featured with chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to determine the relationship between serum adiponectin levels and renal outcome in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.

Methods

This prospective longitudinal study included 2087 CKD patients from the KNOW-CKD study (KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease). Patients were divided into quartiles according to their serum adiponectin levels. The composite renal outcome was defined as one or more of the followings: initiation of dialysis or transplantation, a two-fold increase in baseline serum creatinine level, or a 50% decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) during the follow-up period. A Cox proportional hazard ratio model was applied to analyze the relationship between composite renal outcome and serum adiponectin levels.

Results

Mean patient age was 53.5 ± 12.2 years, and 1273 (61%) were men. The eGFR was 50.4 ± 30.2 ml min−1 1.73 m−2. Mean values of each quartile of serum adiponectin were 2.9 ± 1.4, 7.2 ± 1.2, 12.7 ± 2.0 and 26.1 ± 9.6 μg/ml. Serum adiponectin level was inversely associated with body mass index and eGFR. In multivariate regression models, an association was found between the highest quartile of serum adiponectin and increased risk of composite renal outcome (HR, 1.336; 95% Cl 1.029-1.734).

Conclusion

A high serum adiponectin level is independently associated with poor renal outcome, which suggests the potentially adverse role of adiponectin in CKD progression.

Kaplan-Meier survival curve according to serum adiponectin quartile groups.