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Abstract: SA-PO806

High Circulating Concentrations of Marine-Derived N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Are Associated with Low Risk of Premature Mortality in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Vogelpohl, Fabian, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Gomes Neto, Antonio Wouter, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Martini, Ingrid, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Sotomayor, Camilo G., University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Osté, Maryse CJ, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Berger, Stefan P., University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Navis, Gerjan, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Kema, Ido, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Bakker, Stephan J.L., University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
Background

Cardiovascular disease contributes significantly to high rates of premature mortality in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Plasma marine derived omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (N-3 PUFA) have been shown to have a positive effect on cardiovascular risk in the general population. The benefit of marine derived N-3 PUFA in RTR is unclear as most studies relied on intake derived from food frequency questionnaires rather than on plasma concentrations.

Methods

We included 680 stable RTR with a functioning graft >1 year. Plasma EPA and DPA were measured by Agilent gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. We used linear regression analyses to investigate the association of plasma EPA+DHA with log-transformed plasma concentrations of N-terminal Pro Brain Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP). Cox regression analyses were used to analyze the prospective association of EPA+DHA on mortality.

Results

RTR were 53 ± 13 year old, 386 (57%) were male and mean eGFR was 52 ± 20 ml/min/1.73m2. Mean plasma concentrations of EPA+DHA were 0.28 ± 0.12 μmol/L. Median NT-proBNP concentrations were 249 [IQR 105-625] ng/L. EPA+DHA was inversely associated with NT-proBNP, independent of potential confounders, including age, sex and eGFR (st.β -0.080, P=0.02). During 5.4 years of follow-up, 146 (22%) RTR died. In prospective analyses, we observed EPA+DHA was inversely associated with risk of premature mortality, independent of potential confounders (HR 0.24; 95%CI 0.06-0.98, P=0.047).

Conclusion

High circulating concentrations of marine derived N-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) are associated with low circulating concentrations of NT-proBNP, consistent with beneficial effects on cardiovascular health and low risk of premature mortality in RTR. These results support advices for increased intake of N-3 PUFAs in RTR.