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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO1101

Pre-Transplant Elevated Chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 Influence Kidney Graft Status in Mexican Mestizos

Session Information

  • Transplantation: Basic
    November 08, 2019 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Walter E. Washington Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Transplantation

  • 1901 Transplantation: Basic

Authors

  • Galván, Pedro Alejandro Vázquez, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Cortes, Caridad Leal, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • De buen, Eliseo Portilla, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Medina Perez, Miguel, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Barajas Gutierrez, Luis Nabor, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Ruiz, Aracely Escobedo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Vázquez, Isis Goné, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Navarro, Monserrat Garcia, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Mendoza Cerpa, Claudia Alejandra, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • Gomez-Navarro, Benjamin, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Mexico
Background

A high incidence of CKD in Mexico, affects a significant number of young patients. Chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 may be sensitive markers of rejection or infection. Variability in the genetic background of populations is relevant. The clinical implications of these differences suggest the need to study other traits, including the influence of inflammatory processes in CKD Mestizos.Here, we explore how pre-transplant serum levels of CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 influence kidney grafts at 3 months after transplantation.

Methods

Retrospective study; 57 kidney receptors and 19 donors. Serum base levels of CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 were measured (Luminex 200). Other data were obtained from clinical charts. Correlations and mean comparisons were used to identify possible associations of chemokine levels with several conditions at 3 months.

Results

All chemokine levels were different between receptors and donors (CXCL9: 992.04 pg/mL vs 301.78 pg mL; CXCL10: 37.83 pg/mL vs 30.54 pg/mL; CXCL11: 333.98 pg/ml vs 23.78 pg/mL, respectively; p< 0.05). A negative correlation was identified between base creatinine and CXCL11 (r=-0.268, p=0.043), CXCL10 (r=-0.257, p=0.054), as well as time on dyalisis (r=0.329, p=0.019). CXCL9 was different between sexes (969.22 pg/ml male vs 433.57 pg/ml female; p=0.045). Receptors younger than 25 years had higher CXCL9 values (1282.91 pg/ml <25 y, vs 660.36 pg/ml ≥25 y, p=0.044). Other differences included pre-transplant type of dialysis (CXCL9 1643.95 pg/ml PD, vs 563.16 pg/ml HD, p=0.048). Preemptive patients had lower CXCL10 (23.41 pg/ml no dialysis vs 37 pg/ml peritoneal vs 41.29 pg/ml hemodyalisis; p=0.009). No associations were found between chemokines and infections at 3 months, but were found with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CXCL9: 1842.79 pg/ml toxicity vs 892.45 pg/ml no toxicity; p=0.049).

Conclusion

CKD patients have elevated chemokine serum levels, which associate with age, are reduced after transplantation, and correlate with creatinine. Type and time on dialysis may contribute to high chemokine levels, which may influence graft dysfunctions. Young Mexicans had a predisposition for higher chemokine production.