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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO065

Virtual Nephron: Assessment of a Virtual Reality (VR) Educational Tool

Session Information

  • Educational Research
    November 03, 2023 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Pennsylvania Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Educational Research

  • 1000 Educational Research

Authors

  • Bassil, Elias, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Mehdi, Ali, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Arrigain, Susana, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Schold, Jesse D., University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Sedor, John R., Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Nally, Joseph V., Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • O'Toole, John F., Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Bierer, S. Beth, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Taliercio, Jonathan J., Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Nakhoul, Georges, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
Background

Recent technological advancements within the VR sphere have allowed for the development of innovative technological tools. Using funding from ASN's Bennett Clinical Scholars Program, we developed a 3D VR physiology course and assessed its efficacy on learners’ knowledge gains.

Methods

Internal medicine PGY1 residents were randomized into 2 groups: a VR group (exposed to the VR session) and a traditional group (received a printed script of the VR learning course). The VR session consisted of a 3D review of water and electrolyte transport across the nephron and of the mechanism of action of diuretics. Within a week of the intervention, both groups underwent a 2-hour seminar on physiology of solute/water transport and diuretics. Knowledge acquisition and retention were assessed with a test administered immediately after the conclusion of the 2-hour seminar and repeated within 6-12 weeks. The 40-question test was issued using the secure platform RedCAP. Tests were anonymous, thereby preventing paired test comparisons. We used independent t-tests to compare the number of correct answers and the percent correct between the VR and traditional groups. Initial and follow up tests were evaluated separately.

Results

Of the 188 PGY1 residents who were scheduled and randomized to participate, 117 completed the initial testing. Sixty-four were randomized to the VR group and 53 were randomized to the traditional group. 51.3% of participants were males and average age was 27.3±2.0 years old. Initial test results showed higher scores among VR compared to the traditional group (76.5% correct vs. 68.8%, Table 1). Seventy-eight PGY1s participated in the follow up testing (46 VR group vs. 32 traditional group). Results of the follow up test showed no significant difference in test results. Test score results are summarized in Table 1.

Conclusion

The 3D VR platform appeared to have improved short-term learning but without improving long-term retention. A larger student cohort with longer term follow up will help assess the long-term impact of VR technology and its effect on transfer of learning.