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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO480

Initial Testing of a Novel Vascular Access Device in a Rabbit Model

Session Information

  • Dialysis: Vascular Access
    November 03, 2023 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Pennsylvania Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Dialysis

  • 803 Dialysis: Vascular Access

Authors

  • Owen, Jonathan G., University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Hanson, Joshua Anspach, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Pedrotty, Gus, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Konecny, Tara Gene Ooms, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Sugita, Victoria A., University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Argyropoulos, Christos, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Pedrotty, Sam, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
Background

Ideal vascular access for dialysis is the arteriovenous fistula (AVF). However, AVF have delays in maturation or frequently fail to mature. Arteriovenous graft (AVG) mature more quickly but are prone to thrombosis and have higher incidence of infection. Tunneled dialysis catheters (TDC) can be placed rapidly but have the greatest incidence of infection. Recently, a novel vascular access device was created using a titanium needle guide to be inserted around an artery and separately a vein, allowing the placement of a modified removable shunt. The device could be usable for dialysis rapidly and obviate need for AVF or AVG placement. Feasibility of this device was achieved previously in a porcine model. A rabbit model is sought in this study to expand testing and to examine the effects of repeated arterial cannulation.

Methods

A male New Zealand white rabbit was obtained. After a 2-week acclimation, the animal was anesthetized, the right femoral artery dissected, and the vascular access device attached around it. The device was secured with dissolvable sutures, and site closed in three layers. The animal was recovered uneventfully, and after two weeks the site was well healed. The femoral artery was then cannulated via the device twice per week, with 2.5 mL blood withdrawn during each cannulation, for a total of 4 weeks, after which the animal was euthanized and submitted to pathology for examination.

Results

The vascular access device installed easily and without complication. The surgical site healed well with no visible signs of ischemia, trauma, or discomfort. All arterial access cannulations were successful with bright red arterial blood aspirated. After euthanasia, the femoral artery within the device was found to be intact, without neointimal hyperplasia or thrombosis on histologic examination. No visible signs of ischemia in the femoral artery vascular bed were seen. A small amount of neointimal hyperplasia was seen within the adjacent femoral vein, felt most likely secondary to manipulation and dissection from initial surgical implantation.

Conclusion

The novel vascular access device was successfully implantable in a rabbit model. The device allowed for repeated arterial cannulations as intended. No visible damage of the femoral artery was observed after 8 repeated arterial cannulations over four weeks.