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Abstract: SA-PO560

A Chronic Intermittent Hemodialysis Pig Model for Functional Evaluation of Dialysis Filters

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 801 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Fujimoto, Shouichi, Department of Medical Environment Innovation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan
  • Yamamoto, Shushi, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Japan
  • Umeno, Hiroshi, Medical Technology and Material Laboratory, Asahi Kasei Medical Co. Ltd., Fuji, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Sano, Yusuke, Medical Technology and Material Laboratory, Asahi Kasei Medical Co. Ltd., Fuji, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Koremoto, Masahide, Product Development Strategy Department, Asahi Kasei Medical Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan
  • Goda, Yoshimichi, Department of Hemo-Vascular Advanced Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan
  • Tsuruda, Toshihiro, Department of Hemo-Vascular Advanced Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan
  • Kikuchi, Masao, Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, University of Miyazaki Hospital, Miyazaki, Japan
Background

Performance evaluation of new dialysis filters is primarily performed in vitro, which can lead to differences in clinical results. Currently, data on filter performance and safety are available only for actual hemodialysis patients. Herein, we aimed to establish an in vivo dialysis model that could be extrapolated to humans.

Methods

A bilateral nephrectomy porcine model of renal failure was established, in which a double-lumen catheter for human dialysis was subsequently placed in the external jugular vein under general anaesthesia, the tip of which was fixed to the back (Fig 1). Hemodialysis was performed every other day in the same manner as in humans, during which various clinical data were evaluated. The utility of hemodiafilters coated with and without vitamin E (V-RA and ABHTM) was subsequently compared using this model.

Results

Hemodialysis treatment was successfully performed in bilaterally nephrectomised pigs under the same dialysis conditions as humans (4 h per session, 3 times a week, for 2 weeks). In accordance with human clinical data, regular dialysis alleviated renal failure in pigs, allowing for sufficient activity. The vitamin E-coated filter showed a significantly greater reduction rate of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) during dialysis and a lower quantity of fibrinogen adhesion at the first dialysis on postoperative day 1 than ABH (Fig 2).

Conclusion

Herein, we successfully constructed a pig model of chronic hemodialysis that mimics the pathophysiology and dialysis condition of patients undergoing hemodialysis. This model will be useful for evaluating the performance and safety of dialysis filters before market release.

Funding

  • Commercial Support – Asahi Kasei Medical Co. Ltd.