ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on X

Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO802

Impact of Race on Kidney Transplant Outcomes in Patients with ADPKD

Session Information

Category: Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

  • 900 Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

Authors

  • McGill, Rita L., University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Krishnamoorthy, Sambhavi, University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Girimaji Satishchandra, Niveditha, University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Chapman, Arlene B., University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Background

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is equally present in all ethnicities. Disparities in access to transplant (Tx) exist for African American (AA) and Hispanic (H) ADPKD patients. We examined outcomes among ADPKD patients who received kidney Tx, by self-reported race.

Methods

OPTN/UNOS files were used to identified ADPKD patients age>30 receiving Tx 2000-2021, and ethnicity was White (W), AA, H, or Asian (A). A Cox model provided hazard ratios for death and a subdistribution hazards model for graft failure accounted for death as a competing outcome. Adjustments for age, gender, BMI, HLA/DR mismatch, dialysis years, diabetes, immunosuppression, CMV, cold ischemia, center distance, PRA, private insurance, donor KDPI, delayed graft function, and living/pre-emptive Tx were included with W as the reference.

Results

Among 32,611 ADPKD recipients, W, AA, H, and A were 76.4, 10.7, 9.8,and 3.1% respectively (Table 1). Compared to W, all others had more dialysis years and more mismatches, but less private insurance and fewer living and preemptive Tx. There was more delayed graft function, despite more lymphocyte depleting induction and corticosteroids.

Conclusion

Tx recipient survival did not differ between W and AA ADPKD patients, but was superior in H and A patients. Decreased allograft survival in African American ADPKD patients persisted after adjustment, suggesting that additional biological or social/economic factors remain to be identified.

Patient Characteristics by Race

Patient and Allograft Survival