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Abstract: FR-PO909

Familial Longevity Modifies the Association Between Hypertension and Kidney Function in Ashkenazi Jewish Older Adults

Session Information

  • Geriatric Nephrology
    November 03, 2023 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Pennsylvania Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Geriatric Nephrology

  • 1300 Geriatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Chen, Wei, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Alzyood, Laith, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Sathyan, Sanish, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Aleksic, Sandra, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Gao, Tina, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Milman, Sofiya, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States

Group or Team Name

  • LonGenity.
Background

Familial longevity is associated with protection against age-related diseases. Prior studies suggest that hypertension worsens age-related decline in kidney function. We hypothesized that familial longevity modified the association between hypertension and kidney function in older adults, and sought to identify its associated proteomic profile.

Methods

LonGenity is a cohort study of community dwelling Ashkenazi Jewish adults aged 65-94 years that aims to identify genetic determinants of familial longevity by comparing offspring of parents with exceptional longevity (OPEL) with offspring of parents with usual survival (OPUS). Exceptional longevity was defined as living past the age of 95 years. GFR was estimated using serum creatinine and CKD-EPI equation. In multiple linear regression, stratified by OPEL (n=422) vs. OPUS (n=455), we examined the cross-sectional association between hypertension and eGFR. Plasma proteins (n=4,265) were measured using SomaScan. Top differentially expressed proteins in OPEL vs. OPUS were identified after adjusting for age and sex using a p-value cut-off of 0.001, and then tested for effect modification with hypertension using first-order interaction terms.

Results

Mean age was 76±7 years; 55% were female; 44% had hypertension; mean eGFR was 71±17 ml/min/1.73m2. After adjusting for demographics, marital status, waist circumference, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, the presence of hypertension was associated with 3.3 ml/min/1.73m2 lower eGFR in OPEL (95% CI: -6.4, -0.1; p=0.04) and 4.7 ml/min/1.73m2 lower eGFR in OPUS (95% CI: -8.0, -1.5; p=0.004). Among the top 14 differentially expressed proteins identified, protein-tyrosine sulfotransferase 2 (TPST2) and hepatoma-derived growth factor related protein-2 (HDGR2) significantly modified the association between hypertension and eGFR with a p-value for interaction of 0.04 and 0.003, respectively.

Conclusion

In this unique cohort, we found that the status of familial longevity and proteins associated with familial longevity modified the association between hypertension and eGFR. While further studies are needed to validate these findings, our study could have clinical implications on personalized medicine for the management of hypertension in older adults.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support