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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO077

GLP-1 Agonists-Associated Kidney Toxicities

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 101 AKI: Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Wanchoo, Rimda, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York, United States
  • Sharma, Purva D., Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York, United States
  • Sakhiya, Vipulbhai, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York, United States
  • Jhaveri, Kenar D., Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York, United States
Background

Data on kidney related side effects of GLP-1 agonists have not been well defined. Sparse case reports of AKI have been reported.

Methods

We reviewed the FDA adverse event reporting system (FAERS) and queried for kidney adverse events associated with GLP-1 agonists (semaglutide, exenatide, tirzepatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, Ozempic, Bydureon, Mounjaro, Victoza, Tanzeum, Trulicity, Saxenda, Byetta) between 2010 and 2022 using search terms all related to AKI, electrolyte disorders and hypertension. SAS enterprise guide v7.12 was used to pull data and analysis.

Results

In the last 12 years, a total of 2375 total kidney related adverse events were reported to the FAERS in reference to GLP-1 agonists. AKI was the most common with 58.65% with equal distribution for male’s vs females. HTN(22.02 %) was the next most common event followed by hyperkalemia as the most common electrolyte disorder. Most of the other electrolyte disorders and capillary leak syndrome were uncommon. (Figure). Limitations: The events are reported by providers and/or patients and therefore could have a reporting bias. It is not possible to determine whether an event is truly caused by the drug as opposed to the underlying disease or concomitant medications or by prior drugs administered to these patients. In addition, we cannot get an accurate assessment of incidence rate.

Conclusion

As GLP-1 agonists are being used for DMII and weight loss, as nephrologists we need to be aware of AKI as a potential adverse event associated with this class of agents. The mechanism of injury needs to be determined.

Adverse events reported as (Renal Failure, Renal Impairment, Renal Failure Acute, Renal Injury, Nephritis) presented as one group (RENAL INJURY) - Percentage (%) =n/N*100.