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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO059

Health-Related Social Needs During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

Session Information

Category: Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

  • 900 Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

Authors

  • Novick, Tessa Kimberly, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Osuna-Diaz, Michelle Marie, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Charleston, Jeanne, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Lash, James P., University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Appel, Lawrence J., The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Cohen, Debbie L., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Meza, Natalie, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Allen, Angela, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Crews, Deidra C., The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Background

Health-related social needs, such as housing and food insecurity, are associated with risk factor control and care engagement among people with CKD. Social needs were exacerbated for many during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods

Questionnaires on social needs (housing insecurity, food insecurity, and transportation and utility issues) were administered to participants from three sites of the CRIC study from 2020 to 2023. We examined the prevalence of social needs, and used multivariable logistic regression to identify correlates of social needs.

Results

Among 600 participants, 122 (20%) experienced ≥1 social need, and 29 (5%), 61 (10%), 67 (11%), and 22 (4%) reported housing insecurity, food insecurity, transportation and utility issues, respectively. Compared to participants without social needs, those reporting ≥1 social need were more likely to be female (63% vs 43%) and Hispanic/Latino/a/x (27% versus 23%), and less likely to have a college education (21% versus 42%) (Table).

Conclusion

Among CRIC study participants, Black and Hispanic/Latino/a/x individuals and females were more likely to experience health-related social needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associated long-term outcomes are worthy of investigation.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support