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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO750

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: Prevalence of Pericardial Effusion

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1201 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Cystic

Authors

  • Wulfmeyer, Vera Christine, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany
  • Jost, Johanna Sophia, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany
  • Kaireit, Till F., Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany
  • Auber, Bernd, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany
  • Beller, Johannes, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany
  • Schmidt-Ott, Kai M., Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany
  • Schmitt, Roland, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Niedersachsen, Germany

Group or Team Name

  • Roland Schmitt Lab.
Background

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is associated with a variety of extrarenal manifestations. Previous studies reported a prevalence of pericardial effusion (PE) in ADPKD of up to 35% in U.S. cohorts. Our study is the first to evaluate systematically the prevalence and determinants of PE in a non-U.S. ADPKD cohort.

Methods

Clinically stable ADPKD patients from a specialized outpatient clinic were reviewed retrospectively. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans were investigated regarding the presence of PE (≥4mm). Imaging findings were linked to clinical characteristics.

Results

208 out of 286 ADPKD patients had imaging suitable for evaluation of PE. We detected PE with a mean size of 6.8±3.3mm in 17 patients (8.2%). The prevalence of autoimmune diseases was higher in patients with PE (11.8% versus 2.1%, p=0.022). Overall, we observed a clear female preponderance with a prevalence of PE of 7.8% in females (3.8% in male patients). PE dimension was generally larger in patients with known PE etiology other than ADPKD. Presence and size of PE were not associated with signs of rapidly progressive disease, ADPKD genotype, patient age, body mass index, medications, and other parameters. Exploratory investigation of individual characteristics of patients with PE by regression tree analysis suggested renal functional impairment, sex, and proteinuria as candidate variables.

Conclusion

The prevalence of PE in our cohort was up to four times lower than previously reported and showed a clear female preponderance. The low prevalence of PE compared to recent U.S. data may point to an unknown environmental factor as a cause of PE in ADPKD. Furthermore, our data suggest that patients with a PE size >10mm deserve further attention, as they may have additional non-ADPKD related pathologies.