ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on X

Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO688

The Association Between Urine Oxalate and Citrate May Not Be Diet Driven

Session Information

Category: Fluid, Electrolytes, and Acid-Base Disorders

  • 1102 Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Disorders: Clinical

Authors

  • Prochaska, Megan, University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Coe, Fredric L., University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Worcester, Elaine M., University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Background

Higher urine oxalate excretion has been associated with higher urine citrate excretion and the magnitude of the association is larger in non-kidney stone patients compared with kidney stone patients. The mechanism for this association may be due to simultaneous dietary intake oxalate and citrate in fruits and vegetables or transporter linkage of SLC26A6 and NaDC1 in the kidney .

Methods

Eleven participants, including 3 kidney stone patients, were admitted to the clinical research center and given sodium oxalate. Timed pre-sodium oxalate (1) and post-sodium oxalate (6) urine samples were collected every hour. Urine composition was measured and excretion rates of oxalate and citrate calculated at each period. Mean and standard error were graphed per period and mixed methods longitudinal models were generated to compare change over time versus pre-oxalate value (Period 1) of oxalate and citrate excretion.

Results

Eight of the 11 participants were women with mean age 54 years. Urine oxalate and citrate excretions were higher than pre-oxalate (Period 1) at Periods 4 to 6, and Periods 4 and 5, respectively (Figure 1).

Conclusion

After consumption of sodium oxalate participants had an increase in urine oxalate excretion, as expected, but they also had an increase in urine citrate excretion. The association between oxalate and citrate excretion may not be completely driven by dietary intake.

Figure 1. Excretion of oxalate and citrate per study period. Period 1 represents pre-sodium oxalate baseline value. Periods 2-7 are post-sodium oxalate and timed every 1 hour. Starred periods denote where an indiviudal period was statistically higher than Period 1 in the mixed methods longitudinal model.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support