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Abstract: TH-PO595

Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Adults with Primary Glomerular Diseases in India

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1402 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Grewal, Amritesh, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India
  • Bansal, Bhavik, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India
  • Subbiah, Arunkumar, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India
  • Bhowmik, Dipankar M., All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India
  • Agarwal, Sanjay K., All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India
  • Bagchi, Soumita, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, Delhi, India
Background

There is paucity of information about the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with glomerular diseases.

Methods

We used PROMIS 29 v2.1 (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System) tool to assess the HRQoL impact of primary glomerular diseases in adult patients, under the following domains: physical function, anxiety, fatigue, depression, sleep disturbance, ability to participate in social roles and activities, and pain interference in daily activities. A composite score representing the patient's global HRQoL was calculated using T scores (mean=50, standard deviation=10) of individual domains derived from patient responses. Multivariable linear regression models were evaluated for all domains and composite scores independently.

Results

301 patients were recruited (100 minimal change disease/focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, 75 membranous nephropathy, 109 IgA nephropathy, and 17 membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis). Mean T-scores were: physical function - 48 (47.6-49.9), fatigue - 48.7 (47.6-49.9), anxiety - 51.4 (50.3-52.6), sleep impairment - 44 (42.9-45), depression - 50.1 (49-51.2), ability to participate in social roles and activities - 55.6 (54.5-56.7), hindrance in daily activities due to pain - 51 (50-52).
Worse physical function was significantly associated with female sex (β=3.28), low eGFR (<60ml/min/1.73m2) (β=2.45), unemployed status (β=2.12), obesity (BMI>30) (β=4.4), and edema (β=2.71); fatigue with female sex (β=4.9), low eGFR (β=3.51) and obesity (β=7.41); anxiety with recent steroid use (β=2.61), female sex (β=3.74), and low eGFR (β=2.74) and sleep impairment with recent steroid use (β=3.46), female sex (β=2.56), lower eGFR (β=3.37) and edema (β=4.02). Depression was higher with obesity (β=5.0) and low eGFR (β=2.4) and pain interference with female gender (β=5.95), low eGFR (β=2.38), and obesity (β=4.0). Decreased ability to perform social roles was seen in females (β=4.6), and obese individuals (β=2.58).
Lower composite scores (worse global quality of life) were associated with female sex (β= 3.65), lower eGFR (β= 3.14), and obesity (β=4.02).

Conclusion

Glomerular diseases adversely impact quality of life. Female sex, lower renal function, obesity, clinically apparent edema, and recent steroid use correlate with higher morbidity.