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Abstract: FR-PO413

Association Between Perceived Social Support and Health-Related Quality of Life in Hemodialysis Patients: Results from the TACcare Study

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 801 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Erickson, Sarah Jane, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Yabes, Jonathan, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Han, Zhuoheng, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Steel, Jennifer L., University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Unruh, Mark L., University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Jhamb, Manisha, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

In patients with End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD), high symptom burden and the demands of thrice weekly hemodialysis (HD) contribute to limitations in their daily lives, including a negative impact on their interpersonal relationships. However, there is limited research exploring associations of social support with symptom burden and health related quality of life (HRQoL) among HD patients.

Methods

The Technology Assisted stepped Collaborative Care (TACcare) was a randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of a stepped collaborative care intervention for symptom management in chronic in-center HD patients. The current study is a secondary, cross-sectional analyses of baseline data to examine the sociodemographic and clinical factors that affect perceived social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support; MSPSS), and its association with symptom burden and HRQoL (SF-12 Mental Component Score (MCS) and Physical Component Score (PCS).

Results

For the 160 randomized patients: mean (SD) age 58 ±14 years; 45% female; 28% Black, 13% American Indian, 18% Hispanic; 88 % high school education; 27% married; 4 + 4 years on dialysis. Mean baseline levels of MSPSS from family, friends, significant other, and total were: 21.3 (5.5), 19.8 (6.1), 22.0 (5.3), and 63.1 (14.0), respectively, comparable to other chronically ill populations. High school education (p = .04) and being married (p = .05) were associated with higher total MSPSS scores. Higher MSPSS scores were correlated with lower levels of fatigue (r = .21, p < .01), pain (r = -.17, p = .03), depressive symptoms (r = -.23, p < .01), anxiety (r = -.23, p < .01), and better sleep quality (r = -.32, p < .001) . Higher family, friend, significant other, and total MSPSS support scores were all associated with higher MCS (r = .20, p = .01; r = .25, p < .01; r = .20, p = .01; and r = .26, p < .001, respectively); and higher MSPSS friend support was associated with higher PCS (r = .2, p= .04). After adjusting for age, sex, race, ethnicity, and Charlson comorbidity index, MSPSS total scores were associated with MCS (beta=0.17, p = .001).

Conclusion

Because of the associations between MSPSS and HRQoL, particularly mental health, social support appears to be an important intervention target.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support