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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO664

Mobile Technology to Explore Real-Time Symptom Data and Physical Activity in People Receiving Peritoneal Dialysis

Session Information

  • Home Dialysis - II
    November 04, 2023 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Pennsylvania Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Dialysis

  • 802 Dialysis: Home Dialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Tarca, Brett, University of South Australia Allied Health & Human Performance Academic Unit, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  • Jesudason, Shilpa, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  • Bennett, Paul N., University of South Australia Allied Health & Human Performance Academic Unit, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  • Wycherley, Thomas, University of South Australia Allied Health & Human Performance Academic Unit, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  • Ferrar, Katia, University of South Australia Allied Health & Human Performance Academic Unit, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Background

Fatigue is a frequent and debilitating symptom that contributes to poor quality of life for people receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD). The fatigue experience and factors that may influence it (e.g., mood and physical activity) are poorly understood for people receiving PD, in-part, due to the recall instruments typically used to assess fatigue. Mobile ecological momentary assessment (mEMA) is a survey method that captures data in real-time using mobile phone technology, which has not been trialled in this cohort. The aim of this study was to explore the real-time fluctuations and associations between fatigue, mood and physical activity using mEMA.

Methods

A seven-day longitudinal study was conducted with adults receiving PD. Participants completed fatigue (0-130 [No Fatigue - Severe Fatigue]) and mood (0-10 [Happy - Sad]) Likert scales, via a mobile app, five times each day and concurrently wore an accelerometer to capture physical activity. A feasibility questionnaire was completed via the app on the eighth day.

Results

Forty-eight adults (mean age 61.0+13.5 years) completed the study. Relative to mean wake up score, within-day fluctuations were observed with fatigue less severe from mid-morning to early afternoon (10am-1pm: -9%) before increasing later in the afternoon (4pm-7pm: +14%), peaking at bedtime (+27%). Associations between fatigue and mood were observed with a 1-unit change in mood score conferring a 5.2-unit change in fatigue (p<0.01). Acute relationships were observed with every 1-minute of physical activity associated with a -0.53 (p<0.01) and -0.01 (p<0.05) change in fatigue and mood score, respectively. Overall adherence to the app-based surveys was 73%. Most participants reported mobile phones and the mEMA app being easy to use with some seeing potential in mEMA to assist with the management of their kidney condition, as a self or external monitoring tool.

Conclusion

The results suggest that targeting either fatigue or mood through intervention may be effective for improving both symptoms, with physical activity-based interventions a potential strategy to mitigate fatigue and poor mood. Furthermore, mEMA, and mobile phones, were feasible to capture symptom data with potential to be employed in future research or, as part of improved care.