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Abstract: SA-PO942

Gut Microbiota Profiles Representing Pathogenic Severity in IgA Nephropathy Patients

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1402 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Kim, Yaerim, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Paek, Jin hyuk, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Woo Yeong, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jin, Kyubok, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Seungyeup, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jung Pyo, Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Dong Ki, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Although immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is not a definite genetic disease, it has an autoimmune trait of complex architecture with a solid genetic predisposition. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the difference in microbiota profile among patients with IgAN and healthy controls. In addition, we tried to evaluate the microbiome representing the disease severity.

Methods

We prospectively recruited subjects with IgAN and healthy control between July 2019 and December 2021. Gut microbiota was analyzed using the Illumina MiSeq system based on the 16S rRNA gene. We compared the abundance of the microbiome in each level of phylum, class, order, family, and genus between the groups using Mann–Whitney U test. Also, we tried to find a specific genus representing the disease severity based on the Oxford classification.

Results

A total of 87 subjects (IgAN 59, healthy control 24) were finally included in the study. The mean age was 40.3 and 38.1 years old in IgAN and healthy controls, respectively. The mean eGFR was 89.2 and 107.6 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. At the genus level, there were 32 microbiomes that indicated a detection rate of more than 70% in all of the individuals. In comparing between two groups, the abundance of Blautia, Anaerobutyricum, Dorea, Romboutsia, and Clostridium was higher in IgAN patients. In contrast, Prevotella and Lachnospira were significantly lower in IgAN patients. According to the Oxford classification, the microbiome responsible for the difference in the T score was discovered the most, while the microbiome responsible for the difference in the E and S score was discovered the least. The abundance of Blautia was higher in T1, but Prevotella, Lachnospiraceae, Escherichia, Kineothrix, Lachnospira, and Veillonella were lower in T1 compared to T0. In contrast, only Coprococcus was detected at a higher level in E1, while Parabacteroides was detected at a lower level in S1.

Conclusion

The gut microbiota was well discriminated in subjects with IgAN from healthy controls. In addition, it was also differently observed according to the status of the pathologic findings of IgAN. These results may provide a basis for further metagenomics analysis of IgAN.