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Abstract: FR-PO633

Evaluating the Association Between Maternal Dietary Vitamin A Status and Fetal Kidney Development

Session Information

  • Pediatric Nephrology - II
    November 03, 2023 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Pennsylvania Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Pediatric Nephrology

  • 1900 Pediatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Akbar, Anum, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Vanormer, Matthew, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Slotkowski, Rebecca, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Hahka, Taija Marie, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Thoene, Melissa, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Hanson, Corrine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Anderson Berry, Ann L., University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Mauch, Teri Jo, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
Background


Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in the development of fetal organs. In vitro, studies have indicated that the number of nephrons, which are functional units in the kidney, is impacted by the presence and quantify of vitamin A. However, the effect of maternal dietary vitamin A status on fetal kidney development remains unknown. As abnormal kidney development can contribute to later renal disease, it is important to identify modifiable factors impacting kidney development, such as dietary intake of vitamin A.

Methods

An IRB-approved study recruited pregnant women who completed a food survey (DHQ III) to evaluate dietary vitamin A intake between 24-28 weeks of gestation. Vitamin A intake was measured in retinol activity equivalents (RAE, mcg/day), with <770 mcg/day being deemed inadequate. Fetal ultrasound between 16-20 weeks gestation measured bilateral fetal kidney size and volume. A post-natal retroperitoneal ultrasound was performed 24-48 hours after birth. Kidney length and volume were compared between maternal vitamin A sufficient and deficient groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results

A total of 39 women were included in this analysis, with a median age of 32 years. The median RAE was 661.50 RAE (without supplements) and 1200.00 RAE mcg/day (with supplements). There were no significant differences in fetal right kidney measurements, length, and volume (p = 0.94 and p = 0.44), infant right kidney length and volume (p = 0.94 and p = 0.57) and change in right kidney length and volume (p = 0.78 and p = 0.62) across two groups. Similarly, no significant differences were noted in fetal left kidney length and volume (p = 0.39 and p = 0.10), infant left kidney length and volume (p = 0.20 and 0.10) and change in left kidney length and volume (p = 0.72 and 0.43) across two groups.

Conclusion

Our study did not find any difference in fetal or infant kidney measurements between maternal vitamin A status and fetal and infant kidney measurements. Furthermore, maternal vitamin A status did not impact kidney growth reported as a change in kidney length or volume. Larger, adequately powered studies should be conducted.