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Abstract: SA-PO970

Clinical Picture and Outcome of SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Patients with Glomerular Diseases: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1402 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Lionaki, Sophia, Department of Nephrology, “Attikon” University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • Marinaki, Smaragdi, Nephrology and Transplantation Clinic, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • Kantartzi, Konstantia, Department of Nephrology, University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece
  • Gkalitsiou, Dimitra, Department of Nephrology, “Gennimatas” Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Moustakas, Georgios, Department of Nephrology, “Gennimatas” Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Dounousi, Evangelia, Department of Nephrology, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece
  • Boumpas, Dimitrios, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology Unit, “Attikon” University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • Liakopoulos, Vassilios, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Vaios, Vasileios, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Petrou, Dimitra, Department of Nephrology, “Attikon” University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Greece
  • Agoranou, Maria Eleni Nikolaos, Department of Nephrology, “Attikon” University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Greece
  • Bintas, Christos, Nephrology and Transplantation clinic, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • Gkika, Louiza, Department of Nephrology, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece
  • Papasotiriou, Marios, Department of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation, Patras University Hospital, Patras, Greece
  • Venetsanopoulou, Aliki I., Rheumatology Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece
  • Andronikidi, Eva Paraskevi, Department of Nephrology, 'Aretaieio' Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
  • Kalogeropoulos, Petros, Department of Nephrology, “Attikon” University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Greece
  • Karagiannis, Minas, Department of Nephrology, “Attikon” University Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, Greece
  • Stylianou, Konstantinos, Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraclion, Greece
  • Panagoutsos, Stylianos A., Department of Nephrology, University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece
  • Boletis, Ioannis, Nephrology and Transplantation clinic, Laiko Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Background

This is a retrospective study exploring the clinical picture and outcome of sars-cov2 infection in patients with glomerular diseases (GD) and its impact in the probability of GD relapse.

Methods

Patients with biopsy-proven GD, who had been infected by sars-cov2 were studied. Patients who ended up in ESKD prior to infection or received the diagnosis of GD after the sars-cov2 infection were excluded. We recorded demographics, histopathological diagnosis, past medical history, immunosuppressive regimens, status of GD at the time of infection, clinical picture and outcome of the infection and the GD at end of follow up.

Results

312 patients have been included in the study, of whom 214(68,5%) were diagnosed with sa, while the remaining 98 did not. Infected patients were younger compared with those not infected [44(28-59.75) versus 53(38-64) years, p<0.001]. The mean time from the diagnostic biopsy to Covid-19 was 67,6(±59,3) months. 82,5% of the infected patients were vaccinated against sars-cov2 and 49,1% were on immunosuppressive therapy at vaccination. 28(13%) of the infected patients required admission to hospital, which lasted 8,3(±5,1days. 84,2% of the infected patients experienced complete recovery of the infection, 4(1,9%) died due to Covid-19 and 24(11%) had symptoms for more than 3 months. Among patients who were in remission for the GD, the frequency of relapse of the primary disease was higher in patients with Covid-19 versus not infected patients (11.9% vs. 2.1 %, p=0.007).

Conclusion

According to the findings from this cohort, sars-cov2 infection appears to have a significant impact in patients with GD due to the related morbidity but also by increasing the probability of relapse of the primary disease when compared with patients who not infected with sars-cov2.

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.