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Abstract: TH-PO444

Pregnancy and Its Association with Total Kidney Volume in Nulliparous Women with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1201 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Cystic

Authors

  • Zheng, Bang, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Gitomer, Berenice Y., University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Nowak, Kristen L., University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • You, Zhiying, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Chonchol, Michel, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, United States
Background

There is mounting evidence of metabolic dysregulation contributing to polycystic kidney disease (PKD) progression. The maternal metabolic changes during pregnancies are well described, but the relationship between pregnancy and changes in total kidney volume in women with PKD is unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a pregnancy carried to live delivery in nulliparous PKD women is associated with a greater increase in total kidney volume than in non-pregnant PKD women.

Methods

Using data from the University of Colorado PKD registry from 1985 to 2004, a total of 6 nulliparous PKD women with pre and post-kidney ultrasound measurements for their first pregnancy met the inclusion criteria for the study (cases). Using a pool of 172 women with PKD but without pregnancy, we selected 6 for matches for the PKD women with pregnancies (controls). These women were matched 1:1 by age, race, and eGFR (calculated by the MDRD equation). A two-sample T-test was performed to compare the yearly change in height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV), calculated by ellipsoid formula, between cases and controls. Analyses were further adjusted for history of hypertension.

Results

Of the PKD women with pregnancies, the mean (SD) age and mean (SD) eGFR before pregnancy was 26±3 yrs and 79±22 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively. The median (IQR) htTKV for cases and controls were 288 [248-366] and 350 [240-515]ml/m2 , respectively. The follow-up median duration was 7.00 [2.1-9.5] yrs, for women with and without pregnancies. The yearly percent change (median; IQR) in htTKV in PKD women with and without pregnancies was 14.2 [7.1-15.8] and 7.1 [1.4-8.6]%, respectively (p=0.11). Results remained unchanged after adjustment for history of hypertension.

Conclusion

Nulliparous PKD women demonstrated a faster increase in htTKV after pregnancy than non-pregnant PKD participants; however, it was not statistically significant. Further studies looking at the effect of pregnancy on PKD progression are needed.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support