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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO069

Trends in Race/Ethnicity of ASN Kidney Week Faculty (Speakers, Moderators, and Program Chairs): 2018-2022

Session Information

Category: Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

  • 900 Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

Authors

  • Chopra, Tushar, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Pivert, Kurtis Andre, American Society of Nephrology, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Balogun, Rasheed A., University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • Boyle, Suzanne, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Cobb, Jason, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Waheed, Sana, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Gorji, Hassan, University of San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
  • Malhotra, Rakesh, University of San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
Background

ASN Kidney Week (KW) is the world’s premier nephrology meeting. As one of ASN’s key goals is to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) to advance kidney health, we analyzed self-reported racial/ethnicity amongst KW faculty.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective analysis of trends in race/ethnicity of U.S. KW faculty 2018–2022. Self-reported race/ethnicity for KW faculty (speakers, moderators, and program chairs) was obtained from ASN’s database. We performed a descriptive analysis amongst KW faculty cohort racial proportions over time. Descriptive data is reported as relative percentage frequency. The reported race/ethnicity was: White/Non-Hispanic White, Black, Asian, Hispanic or Latin(o), American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, and Mixed. We also added a category of others/unknowns who did not report race.

Results

23% (mean n=12,132) of ASN members and 16% (mean n=508) of faculty did not self-report race/ethnicity during KW 2018–2022. White (33-35%) was the most common self-reported race among ASN members, followed by Asian (24%). Blacks were 4.3-4.6%, and Hispanics or Latin(o) were 5.4-6% among ASN members. Over the five years, white faculty declined from 54.5% to 48.3%. At the same time, we found improving trends of Blacks in KW faculty representation from 2.7 to 5.4%. Hispanic or Latin(o)representation remains stable at 5.4-6% among KW faculty.

Conclusion

We found that Asian, Black and Hispanics KW faculty were underrepresented as KW faculty. However, these findings may also be reflection of their lower representation as ASN members. Prioritizing DEI to close this gap is key to fostering the innovation and creativity needed to advance kidney health.

Trends in Race/Ethnicity of KW Faculty