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Abstract: SA-PO068

Fellow Attitudes and Perceptions of Health Equity Care and Training in Nephrology

Session Information

Category: Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

  • 900 Diversity and Equity in Kidney Health

Authors

  • Jawed, Areeba, University of Michigan Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L., University of Michigan Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Heung, Michael, University of Michigan Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Mariani, Laura H., University of Michigan Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Rao, Panduranga S., University of Michigan Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Wright Nunes, Julie A., University of Michigan Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
Background

Little is known about the current state of Health Equity care and training within Nephrology Fellowship. We developed a survey to assess fellow attitudes about caring for diverse and underserved patient populations and perceptions on fellow training to prepare them to do so.

Methods

Via a survey administered to all U.S nephrology trainees through the ASN inservice training exam (ITE) Spring 2022 we assessed fellow attitudes and perceptions. The survey included 13 questions: 5 demographics and 8 assessing attitude in caring for underserved patients and perceptions of how well training prepared them to do so.

Results

Of the 816 trainees taking the ITE survey, 706 provided informed consent to use their responses, and 689 responses were analyzed due to missing data, for a response rate of 84.4%. The survey reliability factor was 0.7-0.8. Respondents were on average 34 years old, 57% Male, and 11% Hispanic. Predominant races were White (34.2%) and South Asian (27.7%) and most were international (26.3%) or US (24.3%) medical graduates, with 72.3% reporting working with underserved populations often/always.
In multivariate analysis Hispanic and African American fellows and graduates of US medical schools were more likely to have worked with underserved patients and show concern for disparities within nephrology. Women and fellows who were further out in training scored lower when it came to confidence and perceptions regarding adequate training to reduce health care disparities.

Conclusion

Although fellows stressed the importance of caring for underserved patients a high proportion did not feel fellowship prepared them adequately for this. Effort needs to be made to better equip trainees with the skills they need to care for all patients, with opportunity to address needs in women.