ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on X

Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO582

Comparative Analysis of Cardiovascular Performance in Hemodialysis and Heart Failure Patients

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 801 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Kamran, Hayaan, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Arroyo, Eliott, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Dillman, Drake, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Moe, Sharon M., Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Lim, Kenneth, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
Background

Patients on hemodialysis (HD) exhibit significant impairment in cardiovascular functional capacity that may be comparable to those with non-CKD associated heart failure. The problem is that to-date, no studies have directly compared cardiovascular functional differences between patients on HD compared with non HD patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We hypothesized that patients on HD exhibit unique exercise ventilatory response patterns compared to those with HFrEF and HFpEF.

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of patients on thrice-weekly HD versus HFpEF (EF ≥40%) and HFrEF (EF <40%) patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) at Indiana Universtiy. A total of 90 patients (age=55 [13] years; n=30 per group) were included in this analysis.

Results

There were no group differences in age, sex, or diabetes (all p’s>0.05). The HD group had a higher prevalence of hypertension (p<0.001), lower hemoglobin (Hgb; p<0.001), and lower beta blocker (BB) use (p<0.001) compared to both HFrEF and HFpEF, and a higher proportion of smokers compared to the HFpEF group (p=0.017). After adjusting for these covariates, peak oxygen uptake (VO2Peak) was lower in the HD (12.9 [12.0-14.1] mL/kg/min) and HFrEF (13.0 [12.2-14.3] mL/kg/min) groups compared to HFpEF (16.3 [15.5-17.6] mL/kg/min; p=0.028). Percent of heart rate reserve (% HRR) was lower in the HD group (37.8 [31.6-39.8]; p=0.011) compared to both HFrEF (57.0 [20.9-59.1]) and HFpEF (61.0 [54.8-63.0]). Additionally, VE/VCO2 slope was lowest in the HD group compared to HFpEF and HFrEF (p<0.001). Hgb, smoking, VE/VCO2 slope, and %HRR were significantly associated with VO2Peak in the HD group; this differered with sex, race, VE/VCO2 slope, and %HRR for HFrEF, and sex, BB use, and %HRR for HFpEF.

Conclusion

Patients on HD exhibit similar declines in VO2Peak as those with HFrEF without significant CKD undergoing evaluation for heart transplant, exemplifying the dramatic effects of CKD on cardiovascular health. Chronotropic incompetence and impaired skeletal muscle reserve may be predominant drivers of impaired VO2Peak in HD patients, while impaired lung capacity and cardiac output may be predominant drivers in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF.