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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO894

Kidney Allograft Outcomes Are Similar in Recipients with Living Donors with Hematuria Compared with Recipients with Living Donors Without Hematuria

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 2102 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Singh, Tripti, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Brackman, Krista, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Astor, Brad C., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Mandelbrot, Didier A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
Background

The impact of hematuria in living kidney donors on future donor outcomes has been previously described; but to the best of our knowledge, no previous studies have examined the impact of such hematuria on recipient outcomes. In this study, we study the allograft outcomes in recipients who received an allograft from living donors with persistent microscopic hematuria.

Methods

All adult kidney transplant recipients at our program between 1/1/2000- 6/30/2022 who received allograft from living donor with urine microscopy showing >5 RBC’s/HPF[DM1] in their pre-donor evaluation were included in this study. This cohort was compared to recipients with living donors without hematuria during the same time period. Primary outcomes were allograft failure (defined as re-transplant or return to dialysis) and death censored allograft failure.

Results

112 recipients that received their allograft from a living donor with microscopic hematuria were identified and compared to 1967 recipients that received their allograft from a living donor without microscopic hematuria. Mean recipient age was 51.7 (±14.1) years compared to 50.3 (±13.9) years of donors with hematuria and without hematuria respectively. 40% of recipients were females and 9% were non-white in both groups. Mean age of donors with hematuria and without hematuria was 43.8 (±11.3) years and 44.9 (±11.6) years respectively. There were a total of 773 allograft losses which includes death and 411 death censored graft losses among 2079 kidney transplant recipients. The risk of graft loss (HR 1.06 95% C.I. 0.79, 1.44; p-value 0.67) and death censored graft loss (HR 0.91 95% C.I. 0.59, 1.41; p-value 0.67) was similar in recipients with living donors with hematuria compared to recipients with living donors without hematuria. The risk of graft loss was similar even after adjustment for donor age, donor race, donor sex, recipient age, recipient race, recipient sex and HLA mismatch between the two groups.

Conclusion

The risk of graft failure and death censored graft failure was similar among recipients who received their graft from living donors with hematuria compared to living donors without hematuria.