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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-OR18

The Effect of a Novel Digital Physical Activity Intervention on Health-Related Quality of Life in People with CKD: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial (Kidney BEAM)

Session Information

Category: Augmented Intelligence, Digital Health, and Data Science

  • 300 Augmented Intelligence, Digital Health, and Data Science

Authors

  • Greenwood, Sharlene A., King's College London Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, London, United Kingdom
  • Young, Hannah Ml, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Castle, Ellen M., Brunel University London, London, United Kingdom
  • Walklin, Christy Gareth, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Briggs, Juliet, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Billany, Roseanne, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Bramham, Kate, King's College London Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, London, United Kingdom
  • Bhandari, Sunil, Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Hull, Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom
  • Wheeler, David C., University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • Wilkinson, Thomas James, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Asgari, Elham, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Kalra, Philip A., Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust Salford Care Organisation, Salford, United Kingdom
  • Tollitt, James, Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust Salford Care Organisation, Salford, United Kingdom
  • Taal, Maarten W., Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, United Kingdom
  • Saynor, Zoe Louise, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom
  • Burton, James, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Graham-Brown, Matthew, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Nixon, Andrew Christopher, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Preston, United Kingdom
  • Noble, Helen Rose, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
  • Bishop, Nicolette C., Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
  • Mccafferty, Kieran, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Hamilton, Alexander J., Royal Devon University Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom
  • Campbell, Jackie, University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom
  • Cooper, Nicola, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
  • Macdonald, Jamie Hugo, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom

Group or Team Name

  • Kidney Beam.
Background

Remote digital health interventions (DHI) to enhance PA (PA) provide a potential solution to improve health related quality of life (HRQoL) for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Kidney BEAM trial evaluated the effect of a 12-week PA DHI on HRQoL.

Methods

340 participants with CKD from 11 UK Kidney units were recruited and randomized (1:1) to Kidney BEAM PA DHI (www.beamfeelgood.com) or a waitlist control. The primary outcome was a powered 3-point difference in the Kidney Disease Quality of Life SF 1.3 Mental Component Summary (KDQoL-SF1.3 MCS) between baseline and 12-weeks. Secondary outcomes included KDQoL-SF1.3 Physical Component Summary and sub-scales; physical function (sit-to-stand 60, STS60); patient activation (Patient Activation Measure 13, PAM13); anxiety/depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ4); and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale, CFS). Outcomes were analysed by intention-to-treat approach utilising an analysis of covariance model.

Results

340 participants were included in the intention-to treat analyses. At 12-weeks there was a significant mean difference between Kidney BEAM and waitlist control in KDQoL MCS score of 3.1 {95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8 to 4.4} arbitrary units (p<0.001). KDQoL burden of kidney disease, energy/fatigue, and social function sub-scales (p=0.049, p=<0.001, and p=0.013, respectively) all improved in favour of the intervention. Physical function also improved (STS60 mean between-group difference: 4 {95% CI: 3 to 5} repetitions (p<0.001) and patient activation was enhanced (PAM13 mean between-group difference: 6.9 {95% CI: 4.9 to 8.8} points (p<0.001)). Fatigue and anxiety/depression were unchanged (p=0.33 and p=0.08, respectively).

Conclusion

These results demonstrate that the Kidney BEAM DHI is an effective innovation to improve mental HRQoL in people with CKD. This is the first large randomised controlled trial of an effective, and deliverable, PA DHI for people with CKD.