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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO644

Longevity of Percutaneously Placed Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) Catheters: Single-Center Study

Session Information

  • Home Dialysis - II
    November 04, 2023 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Pennsylvania Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Dialysis

  • 802 Dialysis: Home Dialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Lorio, Alexis, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Joe R and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Liaqat, Mahnoor, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Joe R and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Parra, George L., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Juhas, Claire, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Joe R and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Nweke, David I., The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Joe R and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Nyabera, Akwe, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Division of Nephrology, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Bhattarai, Manoj, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Division of Nephrology, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Bansal, Shweta, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Division of Nephrology, San Antonio, Texas, United States
Background

Percutaneously placed PD catheters are shown to have similar short-term (1 year) outcomes as compared to surgically placed catheters and have been used increasingly. Data on the longevity of these catheters are sparse.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective chart review study of 114 catheters in 91 patients who initiated PD between 2014 and 2020 at University Health System home dialysis center. The last follow-up was December 2022. PD catheters were placed percutaneously (n=81) either by interventional radiologists or nephrologists, or by laparoscopic surgery (n=33) when there were concerns of hernia or adhesions due to prior extensive abdominal surgery or refractory peritonitis. Demographic and clinical data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Results

In the percutaneous group, mean age was 46.4±13 years, 66% were male, mean BMI was 29±6 kg/m2 and diabetes was the cause of kidney failure in 69% of patients. The surgical cohort had similar demographics except mean BMI was 31.2±7.6 kg/m2. Median longevity of an individual catheter determined from PD start to cessation was 90.4 (30.6, 158.8) weeks for the percutaneous and 68.7 (29, 123) weeks for the surgical group. Reasons for catheter removal are shown in Figure 1. The percutaneous group had 0.26 episodes of peritonitis per patient-year, while the surgical group had 0.40 episodes per patient-year. The most common mechanical complications were slow drain and leakage, and these were similar between the two groups. Non-randomization precludes comparison analysis between the groups.

Conclusion

This single-center experience demonstrates that percutaneously placed PD catheters are a viable alternative for long-term PD therapy. Further studies from large centers or databases are needed to confirm our findings which have implications for the direction of PD programs to allocate resources appropriately.

Figure 1